Australiana

Australiana decoration in Federation houses

external image ornate-window-seat1791.jpg Au_parrot_8(1).jpg external image ccffbbfcd67110d884193253b8fef1ca65332819 external image robert-prenzel-kookaburra-1913.jpg external image interior.jpg
Wunderlich Ceilings

See also page Federation Ceilings

Australian leadlight

See also pageFederation Leadlight Windows

Henry Lucien Robert Prenzel Federation Leadlight glass

See also page Art Nouveau and Federation style

Australiana is a term denoting items, people, places, flora, fauna and events of Australian origins.
Anything pertaining to Australian culture, society, geography and ecology can fall under the term Australiana, especially if it is endemic to Australia. Australiana often borrows from Australian Aboriginal culture, or the stereotypical Australian culture of the early 1900s.

  • Objects can be Australiana in their own right, and Australiana can also refer to art with an Australian style or subject. Paintings, ceramics, crafts and coins that depict Australian imagery would fall under this category.
  • These images are often well-known Australian animals and birds, such as kangaroos, koalas, the platypus,echidnas and budgerigars.
  • People are sometimes depicted in the artwork, such as Australian explorers, drovers, bushmen, swagmen,Australian Aborigines, diggers and the like.[1]

A list of significant Australiana

9 January 2012 by IACArchitecture; Art; Bushrangers; Clothes; Entertainment…..

Architecture

  • Australian War Memorial (Canberra)
  • Federation houses
  • Queenslander houses
  • Shrine of Remembrance (Melbourne)
  • Sydney Harbour Bridge
  • Sydney Opera House

Flora & fauna

  • Gum treesexternal image BulletinReciterForAustralia894.jpg
  • Kangaroos
  • Koalas
  • Platypuses
  • Waratah
  • Wattle

Art

image.adapt.1663.medium.jpg

external image Banner1.jpg
The Australiana Society is an incorporated association of collectors, researchers, dealers and auctioneers devoted to collecting, studying and preserving Australiana: art, decorative arts, antiques, historic items, collectables, buildings and sites, and portable heritage made in, or relating to, Australia.


The Discreet Charm of Federation

September 5, 2012 by Ingridweir

Sometimes it’s hard to really see something you’re so used to looking at. There’s so many Federation style houses in Australia, bricky, sitting squarely on the block- the old schoolmasters house seemed just one of many.
external image house-ext2.jpg

But in redesigning a house, I like to work with the style- not fight it or try to make it into something it’s not. So I bought a copy of The Federation House by Ian Evans to start to grasp the logic of these homes. Not to do a perfect restoration job, but to find a way of reinterpreting the elements.

external image n-kangaroo.jpg external image bw-window-detail.jpg

And then a surprising thing; through looking intently at these houses- I came to really like them. Even though there are elements of English Queen Anne and American east coast– they express an emotional connection to Australia. Kangaroos & emus make their way into carved windows and stained glass and gargoyles. Waratahs and flannel flowers are transfered to wallpaper patterns & pressed metal ceilings. Sunrises are captured in wooden grilles. The political event of Federation, the states becoming Australia in 1901, changed the way people saw what was around them.

the front bedroom
the front bedroom
from The Federation House by Ian Evans
from The Federation House by Ian Evans

The front room of the old schoolmasters house has a beautiful bay window, customized now with a built in window seat. Found this splendid drawing in the Evans book, really an encouragement to go all the way!

The most popular element of the Federation era still used in interiors today has to be the pressed metal ceiling– they are being uncovered, put in new, the metal sheets used in bars in Sydney. Had carried a hope that some might be hiding under the new ceilings of the old schoolmasters house- but a roof investigation didn’t reveal any.

Wunderlich factory 1895- making pressed metal ceilings
Wunderlich factory 1895- making pressed metal ceilings

Along with the ceilings, the other inspiring part of Federation style are the windows- epecially the ones with coloured glass and patterns. The new sunroom was basically designed around these recycled windows – a beautiful reminder of the grace notes left behind from the Federation builders & the surprising vitality hidden in their craftsmanship.

Federation rose window in the bathroom
Federation rose window in the bathroom
coloured glass windows used in the new sunroom
coloured glass windows used in the new sunroom
external image interior.jpg

from “The Federation House” by Hugh Fraser and Ray Joyce

external image 575037-1_lp.jpg external image 575057-1_lp.jpg

Ballarat home PHOTOGRAPHY MARK ROPER


Federation Leadlight Glass

Ian Evans writes that:“Federation-style houses constitute a unique statement of patriotism in architectural form.

  • The rising sun emblem that appeared on countless gable ends symbolised the dawn of a new age for Australia and was itself adopted as a national symbol.
  • After more than a century of British cultural domination Australians had begun to find inspiration in their own country and in its remarkable flora and fauna.
  • For the first time, the flowers, birds and animals of the bush were used to decorate plaster, pressed metal, glass, terracotta and fretworked timber.”

1. Gallery from ‘Art Nouveau Stained Glass

external image 7724215944_d48b899fbc.jpg
Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99
2

[★]
[★]

external image spaceball.gif

external image 7724215370_9bca251a51.jpg

A Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99

external image 7724214796_fb3201c580_n.jpg
Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99
external image 7724214308_b478d9225c.jpg

Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen9

external image 7724212460_73e36335f3.jpg
Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99
external image 7724213338_5e8c017021_n.jpg

Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99

external image 7724213820_b2dafd2257_n.jpg

Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99

external image 7724212912_f9385a5be4_n.jpg
Detail of a Stained Glass Window on a Lift Shaft in the Rendezvous Grand Hotel (former Commercial Travellers Association) – Flinders Street, Melbourne
raaen99
external image 8701687642_bf35610914.jpg
A Federation Stained Glass Window of a Sulphur Crested Cockatoo in the Kitchen Door of a Villa – Thornbury
raaen99

external image 12021798546_88d9e8c181.jpg

Detail of a Kookaburra in an Oeil de Boeuf Window of an Edwardian Weatherboard Villa – Ballarat
raaen99

external image 8700563587_2428d88cd1.jpg

A Federation Stained Glass Window of a Sulphur Crested Cockatoo in the Kitchen Door of a Villa – Thornbury
raaen99

external image 8700562919_ed8afc54b8.jpg

A Federation Stained Glass Window of a Sulphur Crested Cockatoo in the Kitchen Door of a Villa – Thornbury
raaen99

external image 12021249503_e95aab3b50.jpg

An Oeil de Boeuf Window featuring a Kookaburra of an Edwardian Weatherboard Villa – Ballarat
raaen99
external image 12163758746_3da31075de.jpgA Window featuring a pair of Kookaburras – Ballarat
raaen99

external image 5498228035_cbda2b8834_z.jpg

Detail of a Kookaburra Stained Glass Window – Brunswick
raaen99

2. Gallery from Bob Bush Leadlight Glass

  • 102 Smith St. Summer Hill NSW 2130. Call Sydney (02) 9799 6107
external image fed21m.jpg
external image fed23m%2520%25281%2529.jpg
external image fed8m%2520%25281%2529.jpg external image img_4.JPG
external image img_12.JPG external image img_11.JPG external image img_10.JPG external image img_6.JPG
Aust_cockatoo_glass_3(14).jpg Kinder-AusutralianaE1.jpg
Aust_glass_Bannan_8(3).jpg Au_parrot_8(1).jpg

Gallery of Federation Tiles

external image 7995046142_1054dc9e01.jpg

An Art Nouveau Washstand tile of a Sturt’s Desert Pea
raaen99

external image 7995041561_9480b80b5b_n.jpg

Detail of an Art Nouveau Washstand tile of a Sturt’s Desert Pea
raaen99

external image 7995041313_9ea1d6bccc.jpg

A Stylised Floral Art Nouveau Washstand tile
raaen99

external image 7995045324_cb52844817.jpg

Detail of a Stylised Floral Art Nouveau Washstand tile
raaen99

external image 8247150326_0e21de8956.jpg

Art Nouveau Hallstand tile of a Water Lily
raaen99

external image 8246082955_fccb3816cc_n.jpg

Art Nouveau Hallstand tile of a Water Lily
raaen99

external image 8247149748_983ecec3b2_n.jpg

Art Nouveau Hallstand tile of a Water Lily
raaen99

external image 8259378586_8226253595_n.jpg
A Stylised Floral Art Nouveau Washstand Tile
raaen99

Robert Wilhelm Prenzel (1866-1941), woodcarver and cabinetmaker

He was the man of whom Mr. J. J. Simons, of the Young Australia League, said ‘Some day connoisseurs will look at a magnificent wood carving and say with conviction, “That’s a Prenzel”, just as they say now, “That’s a Rembrandt,” or “That’s a Corot.” His wood carvings are the most perfect works of art I know.’[2]

Detail of bed from Matthias Suite held at National Gallery of Victoria
Detail of bed from Matthias Suite held at National Gallery of Victoria


Robert Wilhelm Prenzel (1866-1941), woodcarver and cabinetmaker, was born on 30 March 1866 at Kittlitztreben, Prussia, son of Robert Wilhelm Prenzel, carpenter, and his wife Johanna.

  • After completing a four-year apprenticeship with the Elbing woodcarver Gebauer, he studied at the Düsseldorf Academy, and ‘carved’ his way through Europe for four years before arriving in Melbourne on 24 November 1888. On 28 November 1890 he married Mina Schelling; they had three children. He was naturalized in 1897.
  • In Melbourne Prenzel first worked for a shipbuilder and, as a modeller of terracotta architectural ornaments, for Otto Waschatz.
  • During the 1890s he designed furniture for Nunan Bros and was in partnership with Johann Treede.
  • Treede & Prenzel, architectural modellers, designers and woodcarvers, worked on such projects as the carvings of the ceiling and walls of St Patrick’s Cathedral.
  • In the early 1900s Prenzel was in business on his own as a woodcarver in South Melbourne, and, from about 1910 to 1930, as a furniture manufacturer in Toorak Road, South Yarra.
Mr R. Prenzel at work on a Queenslandcoat of arms for the Young Australia League
Mr R. Prenzel at work on a Queenslandcoat of arms for the Young Australia League

Prenzel was a craftsman of great skill and facility and, during his long working-life, produced numerous carvings and great quantities of cabinet furniture.

  • His early work was in the Continental Gothic-Renaissance and Rococo revival styles; but, encouraged by J. A. Panton ‘to carve things which would be more readily understood … the flora and fauna of Australia’, he became a champion of things Australian, establishing a native garden at Black Rock and becoming an adviser to the Commonwealth government on Australian timbers.[3]

Despite his acclaim as a leading artist, Robert Prenzel’s `naturalisation’ as an Australian citizen in 1897 did not save him from the effects of anti-German feeling during World War I. In the very different social climate after the war, his Australian Art Nouveau furniture was less in demand, and he found himself deserted by many of his `society’ clients.

Robert Prenzel 1886-1941 Paperback– December 31, 1994  by Terence Lane (Author)
Robert Prenzel 1886-1941 Paperback– December 31, 1994 by Terence Lane (Author)
external image robert-prenzel-1906-mathias-suite-details-of-wardrobe.jpg?w=710
Detail, Large wardrobe from the Mathias suite, blackbean, 1906

Things were going so well for him that he moved his workshop to 11 Toorak Road, South Yarra, to be near all his affluent customers.
Then things got tough for Prenzel during the war years. He would sit in his shop front window in Toorak Road carving these unique panels as a way to supplement his income.

external image 148.jpg
external image robert-prenzel-kookaburra-1913.jpg
Robert Prenzel carved panel of two kookaburras on a eucalypt branch dated 1923
Robert Prenzel carved panel of two kookaburras on a eucalypt branch dated 1923
Mathias suite washstand
Mathias suite washstand
Matthias Suite wardrobe detail
Matthias Suite wardrobe detail
Three of the 36 double sided panels from the staircase of the Glenormiston homestead in the Western District of Victoria.
Three of the 36 double sided panels from the staircase of the Glenormiston homestead in the Western District of Victoria.

Henry, Lucien

Lucien Henry, who in Sydney in 1879 from political exile in New Caledonia, was an artist who, during his relatively short stay, pioneered the use of
external image 237.1983%23%23S.jpg.137x165_q85.jpg
Australian motifs as a national style in decorative art. Henry worked in a wide range of media from painting, sculpture and architecture to stained glass and other decorative arts. He was particularly interested in the decorative form of the waratah, which he integrated into a number of his works. As a teacher and art instructor at the Working Men’s College, and later the Sydney Technical College, he influenced a rising generation of Australian artists and, importantly, art teachers.

An Australian style

Henry’s working life in Sydney coincided with a growing sense of national pride coupled with an increasing urgency for a national style, as the colony approached its centenary event. Artists such as Julian Ashton were urging fellow artists to paint contemporary Australian scenes to illustrate the Australia around them, while theBulletin was also in favour of an emerging Australian identity in the arts.
Henry saw the forms of Australian flora and fauna as ideal representations of the nation, and his work through the middle and late 1880s reflected this. Henry was particularly entranced by the waratah which he championed in a number of his own designs and templates for use in architectural and artistic works. was Henry’s influence in the use of the native flora and fauna that in 1915, Richard Baker, Curator and Economic Botanist at the Technology Museum (now Powerhouse Museum) wrote

  • Visions of a Republic: the work of Lucien Henry
    Visions of a Republic: the work of Lucien Henry

    It is impossible to say now, or to give the name of individuals who idealised or conventionalised the Lotus, Acanthus, Honeysuckle or Iris, but in this young country of a little over a century’s growth, a few of the artists’ names may be mentioned who have introduced our native flora in decorative arts…Mr Lucien Henry, the first teacher in Art was par excellence a designer from nature…In Mr L Henry, Australia certainly had an artist possessing real genius, and his originality in design and other fields of fine and Applied Art will live long in the annals of New South Wales technical education. (His works) are a splendid proof of the fertility of his brain, for they cover original designs from our native fauna and flora in architecture, ironwork, wall-papers, glass, stained windows, jewellery, china, chandeliers, electric lights, tiles, horology &c. [10]

Henry’s contribution to the development of an Australian style was most dramatically shown in his book Australian Decorative Arts . Produced between 1889 and 1891, Henry’s book was made up of 50 large format plates and 50 illustrations which he conceived as the foundation of a National School, and dedicated to the youth of Australasia. [11]Henry’s book recast many classical architectural forms, such as a Corinthian column capital into a lyrebird capital, and placed native plants and animals into traditional formats such as cabbage palm rosettes, waratah panels or kookaburra lamp stands.

external image fountainsm.jpg external image ccffbbfcd67110d884193253b8fef1ca65332819 external image 237.1983%23%23S.jpg.137x165_q85.jpg
Lucien HenrySelf portrait (1880s)237.1983
external image 238.1983%23%23S.jpg.112x165_q85.jpg

Lucien Henry
Waratah (1887)238.1983

external image 13babd2bd74d6852b69ed0554a7dd39aed663037
Lucien Henry, Public Park Fountain,Hippocampus and waratah,
Watercolour over pencil, circa 1890.
Henry designed this Islamic-style pleasure dome in the shape of a giant red waratah bloom. At its centre is a fountain.
Copyright: Powerhouse Museum, Sydney.
Lucien Henry design for wall paper 1915
Contributed by Internet Archive [The Australian flora in applied art (1915)]
This Beaux-Arts graduate and Paris Communard was exiled from France to New Caledonia, settling in Sydney after his reprieve in 1879. As both teacher and practising designer, Lucien Henry made a vital contribution to the Sydney art scene during two of its most active and experimental decades. Fascinated by the pictorial possibilities of native flora and fauna – especially the waratah, the floral emblem of New South Wales – Henry produced superlative designs for stained glass, interior décor, architecture and items of applied art. He also created this striking, highly-detailed painting, ‘Waratah’, with its scarlet bloom set against an intricate turquoise-and-gold geometric Islamic-style pattern. It was exhibited in 1887 at the Eighth Annual Exhibition of the Art Society of NSW. Stained glass figure representing Australia, Sydney Town Hall

 

  • Click here or on the first image above to read a transcript of John Docker’s talk on Henry Lucien.

Galleries to visit on-line:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/40262251@N03/sets/


Collection: Powerhouse Museum

xmas-stained-glass-450x458.jpg
xmas-stained-glass-450×458.jpg

(Image: Stained glass panel, eucalyptus, waratah, flannel flower and Christmas bush design, lead, glass, made by George Hulme, Sydney Technical College, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1900-1907)
– See more at: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/insidethecollection/category/design-and-designers/page/6/#sthash.ZdhZBrLu.dpuf


Federation Cornice

external image f.ashx?v=1939
In 1910 the Commonwealth of Australia was created by the federation of the states. In a new spirit of nationalism an attempt was made to create a distinctive Australian style.
external image f.ashx?v=473

The Federation style borrowed much from previous periods but some distinctive features evolved, particularly the use of motifs derived from native Australian plants and trees.
external image logo.gif
CN454

Ceiling: 300.00 mm
Wall: 275.00 mm
Length: 3.25 m

These scenes from 19th centurary Australia depict the spirit of the country at the time of federation. An historic and very Australian cornice.
external image f.ashx?v=278
CN424

Ceiling: 110.00 mm
Wall: 110.00 mm
Length: 3.60 m

Federation decoration often included images of Australian native flora. Cornice Cn424 shows wattle leaves.

CN451
external image f.ashx?v=282

Ceiling: 110.00 mm
Wall: 120.00 mm
Length: 3.60 m

The gum nut is essentially Australian.
Cornice CN451 uses the gum nut to express its Australian federation quality.
A great cornice for kids rooms or any room where you want something uniquely Australian.

CN35
external image f.ashx?v=284

Ceiling: 77.00 mm
Wall: 95.00 mm
Length: 3.60 m

Cornice CN35 is another gumnut themed cornice. It can be used on lower ceilings but other wise has the same Australian quality.


  1. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australiana
  2. ^

    http://manins.net.au/black-rock/prenzel.html

  3. ^ http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/prenzel-robert-wilhelm-8104
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s