Art Nouveau ‘Murnell’

Murnell, a period-perfect Art Nouveau house

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Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002

Agent Paul Caine, advertising the property as “combining period class and charmed modern style”, is anticipating something between $3 million and $4 million when Murnell goes under the hammer at 11.30am on Saturday 23/09/2017.

Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002
Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002

‘Murnell’ – Modern Art Nouveau Villa C1909


This four-bedroom 1909 home is quite exceptional, especially in Victoriana-rich East Melbourne, because its style is Art Nouveau.

'Murnell' - Modern Art Nouveau Villa C1909
‘Murnell’ – Modern Art Nouveau Villa C1909
  • Carved into the wooden fretwork of the lofty rooms with their pressed-metal ceilings and stained glass windows are silhouetted images of kookaburras and waratahs.
  • It’s rare, too, because since it was commissioned and built by Miss Elizabeth Clarke — a member of the richest family of turn-of-the-20th-century Victoria, and, incidentally, the dynasty who raised of some of the biggest private houses in Australia (think Rupertswood, Cliveden and Queen Bess Row) — Murnell has only had five owners.
Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002
Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002

Gorgeous high ceilings, leadlight windows, ornate fireplaces, and original timber floors are just a few of the classic features that still exist through this generous double storey property.

  • A long entry hall feeds off into an airy formal lounge which showcases built-in seating positioned directly in front of an elegant bay window, with this lounge further oozing into a large formal dining room. Both these rooms enjoy open fireplaces and an abundance of space and light.

Over the 20 years that the relinquishing owners have been custodians of “an elegant, spacious, light-filled house, we’ve hardly touched it apart from remodelling the conservatory and refreshing the paint”.

  • “Most of our work has been in preserving what’s there,” she says.
Classic features still exist through this generous double storey property.
Classic features still exist through this generous double storey property.

 

The historic Melbourne house that shouldn’t really be there


Murnell is also rare because, according to the original 1860s subdivision of the block bordered by George, Clarendon and Hotham streets, it shouldn’t even be there.

  • The hilltop site, already sacred as a corroboree ground before being designated for the proposed Anglican Cathedral of Melbourne, was taken up instead by the smaller Holy Trinity Church when St Paul’s Cathedral was slated to be erected on the corner of Flinders and Swanston Streets in the city.
  • When Holy Trinity burned down in 1905, leaving only four standing walls and the brick schoolhouse behind, the congregation opted to replace the church but to locate it closer to the corner of Hotham and Clarendon. That left the George Street frontages available for subdivision.

Miss Clarke — presumably using substantial monies promised or left to her by the wealthy and widowed chatelaine of ClivedenLady Janet Clarke— pounced on a two plots, buying both 190 and 190A George Street.

  • She had architect, C.A. Cowper design her a finely crafted home, replete with the most modern and fashionable fittings and fixtures.
  • She then promptly died and her new house “in the prominent and desirable location” was auctioned “at half past 2 o’clock” in July 1910. It realised £1395 and a 25 per cent on-the-spot deposit was required.
Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002
Murnell, 190 George Street, East Melbourne VIC 3002

The equally well-heeled Misses Roche bought the house and held it until 1953 when it was purchased by the Tramways branch of the Returned Soldiers Sailors and Airmens Imperial League (forerunner of the RSL), who locked up the top storey and used only the front two downstairs rooms as a library and meeting place.

  • With another new owner in 1991, the side garden was subdivided off before a further sale to a local lady who put a conservatory on to capture north light and replace the lost outdoor amenity.
  • In 1997 and in a fortuitous “one last bid” at an auction attended by 200 other people, the present owners purchased Murnell.
  • They’d been stalking the suburb for a decade, looking for a place to live and from where he could walk across the park to his city office. In Murnell they found more than they were looking for.

Having since relocated to Sydney, the couple are reluctantly letting go of their beloved, storied home that she says “is indeed such a rare survivor”.

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Federation Excellence

A Gallery of Great Federation Design

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external image Federation%252520Excellence%252520Animation.gif
These beautiful heritage buildings are works of Art. They are known by their own names, and are mixed media masterpieces often with fancy brickwork, fine tiling and at best parquetry flooring, with complex skilled joinery, artistic embellishments such as ornate ceilings, beautiful artisan lead light windows and a valued heritage.
The individual residences showcased here are each listed in the References below.

Federation Style

Federation style derived from the architecture of the English Revival which celebrated variability – sometimes referred to as the aesthetic of the ‘picturesque’.[1]

  • The picturesque aesthetic can also be seen as a rejection of the modern world of darkened cities, factories and mass production in that it celebrated traditional craftsmanship through the varied use of materials such as stone, brick, shingle and timber.
  • See also Picturesque Queen Anne
The Fairfax family’s vast harbour-front Point Piper estate, Elaine, is being introduced to the market as “Elaine Gardens”, worth $80m. The picturesque Gothic home has been owned by the Fairfax media dynasty since 1891 when it was bought for £2100.
The Fairfax family’s vast harbour-front Point Piper estate, Elaine, is being introduced to the market as “Elaine Gardens”, worth $80m. The picturesque Gothic home has been owned by the Fairfax media dynasty since 1891 when it was bought for £2100.

 


Federation Exteriors

Edzell, 76 St Georges Road Toorak Victoria, in English Revival (Queen Anne) style
Edzell, 76 St Georges Road Toorak Victoria, in English Revival (Queen Anne) style

 


1. Queen Anne Style

The Queen Anne style took its name from the British monarch of late 17th century but, in reality, derived inspiration from the Tudor and other earlier periods.

  • The Gothic (Queen Anne) Revival style is part of the mid-19th century picturesque and romantic movement in architecture, reflecting the public’s taste for buildings inspired by medieval design. This was a real departure from the previously popular styles that drew inspiration from the classical forms of ancient Greece and Rome.
The Gables Mansion and Gardens by Ussher and Kemp
The Gables Mansion and Gardens by Ussher and Kemp

 

The grand Federation home, "Lugano", 17 Victoria Square Ashfield
The grand Federation home, “Lugano”, 17 Victoria Square Ashfield

Richard Norman Shaw was the Revival’s most influential British exponent in the late 19th century.
In Australia, this became the Federation Queen Anne style
Its clearest identifying features are:

  1. tall striated brick chimneys,
  2. striped Tudor-style batons on gables, called ‘half timbering’,
  3. overhanging upper-storey windows called oriels and
  4. ornamental timber work particularly on verandahs.
Picturesque design especially at the roof level at 27 Balwyn Road, Camberwell, Victoria by Architects Ussher and Kemp
Picturesque design especially at the roof level at 27 Balwyn Road, Camberwell, Victoria by Architects Ussher and Kemp

‘Queen Anne’ exteriors tended to be asymmetrical with elements such as a turret or unexpected circular window added for interest and delight. In this respect English Revival architecture was a reaction against a formulaic and predictable Georgian classicism.

Booloominbah by John Horbury Hunt, UNE Armidale, Southern Elevation
Booloominbah by John Horbury Hunt, UNE Armidale, Southern Elevation
“The principle behind the “English Revival” (Queen Anne) or “Gothic” home is one of frankness.

English cottage style
English cottage style

That is, the exterior is a frank expression of the interior.
The floor plan is first laid out and, regardless of its intricacy, the exterior is made to reveal what it encloses.”

  • “Thus the Gothic (Queen Anne) style is the most flexible of all.
  • Though symmetry is sacrificed it is more than made up for in the subtle balancing of parts.
  • The finished result, if carefully watched, will be a beautiful composition of shapely architectural forms, varied wall surfaces, projecting casements and rich, decorative detail.
  • For the expression of one’s personality in a home, nothing could be more pliable, and in the end satisfying.”
    – 1928, the Builder’s Home Catalog[2]

“The (smaller) English Cottage style is notable for its steeply pitched, cross-gabled roof.

  • Decorative half timbering is common in the gable and second story.
  • The windows are relatively tall and slender with multi-pane glazing separated by either
    wood or lead (bars).
  • Chimneys are very large and commonly decorated with ornate chimney pots.”[3] (see below)

Two Launceston Federation Houses,

designed by Queensland Architect J. Martyn Haenke

  • Haenke (originally from Toowoomba, Queensland) was designing buildings in Launceston between June 1904 and May 1906.
  • Haenke managed to integrate elements of the Arts and Crafts Movement and bold Art Nouveau forms with the use of timber work, brick and tile common with his contemporaries.
  • Some time in 1905 he left for the mainland and then to California, where he became an architect of note.
36 Lyttleton Street East Launceston Tasmania; heritage named 'Victoria League House' built in 1905 by J. & T. Gunn and then known as ‘The Manor House’, the private residence of Cyril Perrin, a leading Launceston businessman. THR ID #4445
36 Lyttleton Street East Launceston Tasmania; heritage named ‘Victoria League House’ built in 1905 by J. & T. Gunn and then known as ‘The Manor House’, the private residence of Cyril Perrin, a leading Launceston businessman. THR ID #4445
  • Harrap House now Egremont 20 Welman Street, Launceston
  • At a cost of £1,784 of 13 rooms with 12 foot ceilings on the corner of Wellman and Elizabeth Streets, commenced 4 July 1903 and completed April 1904, survives virtually intact and untouched as evidenced by the photographs, even down to its original light fittings with their shades. [4]
  • Egremont 20 Welman Street, Launceston TAS. designed for the Harrap family (Ada, May, and brother George) by J Martyn Haenke; now operating as Egremont Bed And Breakfast; THR #4696
    Egremont 20 Welman Street, Launceston TAS. designed for the Harrap family (Ada, May, and brother George) by J Martyn Haenke; now operating as Egremont Bed And Breakfast; THR #4696
Lenoma, 7 Chrystobel Crescent Hawthorn, Victoria
Lenoma, 7 Chrystobel Crescent Hawthorn, Victoria

“This gracious six bedroom and study Federation residence c1910 is a grand two-level domain of rich original charm and light
with street and parkland frontage in the exclusive heart of the prestigious Grace Park Estate”


2. Arts and Crafts style

Hollowforth2.jpg

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Hollowforth, Neutral Bay, by Architect Edward Jeaffreson Jackson Redleaf, 8 Redleaf Ave, Wahroonga NSW
Patterns of Arts and Crafts.jpg
Patterns of Arts and Crafts.jpg

Even more than Queen Anne, Arts and Crafts celebrates the artisanship of the carpenter, bricklayer, mason, plasterer and glazier.

Arts and Crafts placed added emphasis on the variation of materials. But the elements of the Arts and Crafts design tend to be less flamboyant and overtly historical than those in Queen Anne.

Hollowforth by architect E. Jefferson Jackson
Hollowforth by architect E. Jefferson Jackson

Arts and Crafts celebrated traditional craftsmanship through the

  1. varied use of materials such as stone, brick, shingle and timber.
  2. fine detailing and natural ‘organic’ shapes – flowers in particular – were important.
  3. rough-cast (or pebble-dash) style wall decoration is an important component of the style, adding another form of natural finish.
  • See Federation Arts and Crafts style
  • Contemporary North American architecture, too, was influenced by this craft revival. It, in turn, influenced aspects of Australian architectural design, particularly with the local adoption of the wall hung timber shingle.
  • The Arts and Crafts Movement was one of the most influential, profound and far-reaching design movements of modern times. It began in Britain around 1880 and quickly spread across America and Europe
    "Trevenna" Armidale NSW, is clearly representative of the domestic architecture of Hunt.
    “Trevenna” Armidale NSW, is clearly representative of the domestic architecture of Hunt.
  • See also Shingle styles in Australia
Officer House, Eaglemont Vic 2008
Officer House, Eaglemont Vic 2008
Federation Arts and Crafts home at 4 Elsmere Street East Launceston; THR ID #4183
Federation Arts and Crafts home at 4 Elsmere Street East Launceston; THR ID #4183

3. Federation Bungalow style


The Federation Bungalow style employed design elements of the other two styles but usually in a simplified fashion.

'Travancore' - by Ussher & Kemp, 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell
‘Travancore’ – by Ussher & Kemp, 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell
  • A Federation Bungalow was typically single storey with emphasis on the verandah; the element that characterised the original bungalow derived from colonial India. [4]
    Federation Bungalow Home, 'Amalfi' 2 Appian Way, Burwood, NSW
    Federation Bungalow Home, ‘Amalfi’ 2 Appian Way, Burwood, NSW

The Federation Bungalow style was the Australian response to the bungalow style that was developed in America by people like Gustav Stickley.

  • Gustav Stickley was a furniture manufacturer, design leader, publisher and the chief proselytizer for the American Craftsman style, an extension of the British Arts and Crafts movement.
'Travancore' - Ussher & Kemp Grandeur - 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell, Vic.
‘Travancore’ – Ussher & Kemp Grandeur – 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell, Vic.
Rokeby, the house at 78 Athelstan Road, is a red brick Federation house with a return verandah and angled corner bay, anchored compositionally by two projecting brick wings to the east and south.
Rokeby, the house at 78 Athelstan Road, is a red brick Federation house with a return verandah and angled corner bay, anchored compositionally by two projecting brick wings to the east and south.
  • ‘Rokeby’s site placement, angled corner bay, and placement of a pyramidal roof form punctuated by projecting sitting room and dining room bays, is a clear and mature reflection of the external massing that would mark the Federation period.
  • Its pinwheel placement of rooms around a central hall became thoroughly characteristic of internal planning in the Federation period.
  • Rokeby is quite close to the seminal Federation plans by Alfred Dunn and Beverley Ussher of 1889-1892.”
'Blackwood' 13 Kasouka Road, Camberwell, Victoria
‘Blackwood’ 13 Kasouka Road, Camberwell, Victoria
Federation Bungalow design at 15 Currajong Avenue Camberwell VIC 3124 (part of the Sunnyside Estate)
Federation Bungalow design at 15 Currajong Avenue Camberwell VIC 3124 (part of the Sunnyside Estate)

By 1915 the bungalow was being promoted as the ideal home, in contrast to the terrace house form popular in the nineteenth century. (e.g. “Bring Back Bungalows“)

Tessellated verandah tiling is a very desirable feature at 'Susquahana' 162 Cross Road, Malvern SA
Tessellated verandah tiling is a very desirable feature at ‘Susquahana’ 162 Cross Road, Malvern SA

 


 

4. Federation Filigree Style

Federation Filigree was designed to create shade while allowing for the free flow of air. The “Queenslander’ is the foremost example of this style.

Earlsferry House and Grounds 1A Nurstead Ave, Bassendean, W.A.
Earlsferry House and Grounds 1A Nurstead Ave, Bassendean, W.A.
792px-(1)_Derry(former_home_of_May_Gibbs)1.jpg
Derry (former home of May Gibbs) Neutral Bay, NSW
Earlsferry is a two storey brick, iron and timber house in the Federation Queen Anne style. May Gibbs was one of Australia’s foremost children’s authors and illustrators. known for the iconic Australian children’s story, The Complete Adventures of Snugglepot and Cuddlepie
This Queenslander is one of the most spectacular timber houses in Brisbane: Cremorne, heritage-listed Hamilton Hill riverfront mansion at 34 Mullens Street, Hamilton QLD 4007, sold for over $7 million on 18 December 2015
This Queenslander is one of the most spectacular timber houses in Brisbane: Cremorne, heritage-listed Hamilton Hill riverfront mansion at 34 Mullens Street, Hamilton QLD 4007, sold for over $7 million on 18 December 2015

These houses have:

  • balconies screened with decorative balustrading
  • cast-iron (or later: timber) balustrades and brackets
  • common verandah posts, panels, friezes and brackets, which were manufactured products made in Australia,

These houses are instantly recognised as Federation for the following features:

  • Dominant hipped roofs, often broken by false gables
  • Turned or square timber verandah columns supplemented by elaborate timber decoration
  • Leadlight or coloured glass windows
  • Late 19th or early 20th Century period of construction
MOSMAN_1_Avenue_Road.jpg
Monterey Federation Apartments at 1 Avenue Road MOSMAN, NSW
Kianga - Vaucluse Federation House
Kianga – Vaucluse Federation House

 


Federation Interiors

Overseas interior trends influenced Federation interiors in Australia:

  1. The Gothic Period was a revival by the Victorians in the 19th Century and was a style that had a religious symbolic base.
  2. The Victorian Period provided a great change for the middle-class home. Goods and services became more accessible for the general population, and pride in the home began to show.
  3. Art Nouveau is considered the first style of the 20th Century, and a movement forward in the way design was concepted, coming from the present rather than looking back at the past. In interiors, Art Nouveau influenced joinery, leadlight glass and wallpapers.
    Art Nouveau interior at Werona, 33 Trevallyn Road, Trevallyn, Tas 7250
    Art Nouveau interior at Werona, 33 Trevallyn Road, Trevallyn, Tas 7250
Art Nouveau joinery and leadlight at Chadwick House designed by Desbrowe-Annear in Melbourne
Art Nouveau joinery and leadlight at Chadwick House designed by Desbrowe-Annear in Melbourne
  1. The Arts and Crafts movement, and then
  2. Edwardian style are major influences on our Federation interiors.
    Edwardian interior at Braemar, 36 Currajong Avenue, Camberwell, Vic
    Edwardian interior at Braemar, 36 Currajong Avenue, Camberwell, Vic
Edzell_House-76-St-Georges-Road-Toorak-VIC_prestigepropertymelbourne_4_729-420x0.jpg
Wall panelling and picture rails at Edzell House 76 St Georges Road Toorak Melbourne
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external image 36%252520Lyttleton%252520Street%25252C%252520East%252520Launceston%252520image10.jpg external image Manor%252520house%252520principal%252520bedroom%252520fireplace.jpg
  • The artistic and build quality of the timber joinery is considered the ‘measure’ of Federation interior decoration.[5]
Ornate bay window arch at Travancore, 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell, Victoria
Ornate bay window arch at Travancore, 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell, Victoria
Ornate interiors at Coomaroo, 63A Albany Road Toorak, Victoria
Ornate interiors at Coomaroo, 63A Albany Road Toorak, Victoria
  • Inside the house, colours were muted but decoration was ornate.
Leadlight glass at 46 Bowen Crescent Carlton North 3054
Leadlight glass at 46 Bowen Crescent Carlton North 3054

Ballarat home featuring Australian motifs in leadlight glass windows
Ballarat home featuring Australian motifs in leadlight glass windows
PHOTOGRAPHY MARK ROPER
PHOTOGRAPHY MARK ROPER

1. Australian motifs

from "The Federation House" by Hugh Fraser and Ray Joyce
from “The Federation House” by Hugh Fraser and Ray Joyce
  • Australian motifs abound with flora and fauna both displayed in the plaster ceilings or used in fabrics, wallpaper, glass and tiles.
  • The most prevalent Australian motif is the ‘rising sun’ as a gable decoration.

2. Coloured glass or lead-light

  • Coloured glass or lead-light was used throughout Federation homes and the top panels of the front door often featured panels of colour in soft pastels with Art Nouveau or Australian motifs.
  • Leadlights or leaded lights are decorative windows made of small sections of glass supported in lead cames, and impart elegance and romantic charm to the rooms they illuminate.
  • This tradition is a Gothic influence, deriving from the stained glass of Gothic Revival churches.
  • Federation leadlight is usually inspired by Art Nouveau, and so has a fanciful, natural theme:
Art Nouveau leadlight at Vermont, 16 Adelaide Street, East Launceston
Art Nouveau leadlight at Vermont, 16 Adelaide Street, East Launceston
16 Adelaide Street, East Launceston shows Alexander North in an inventive mood
16 Adelaide Street, East Launceston shows Alexander North in an inventive mood
Leadlight glass at 46 Bowen Crescent Carlton North 3054
Leadlight glass at 46 Bowen Crescent Carlton North 3054
Ornate leadlight glass at Carramah, 31 Canterbury Road, CAMBERWELL, Victoria, by Architects Ussher and Kemp
Ornate leadlight glass at Carramah, 31 Canterbury Road, CAMBERWELL, Victoria, by Architects Ussher and Kemp
The Gables Tea-room: Renowned Queen Anne architects Ussher and Kemp celebrate Australian flora and fauna in the intricate plasterwork and leadlight throughout the Gables mansion.
The Gables Tea-room: Renowned Queen Anne architects Ussher and Kemp celebrate Australian flora and fauna in the intricate plasterwork and leadlight throughout the Gables mansion.

3. Bulls-eye windows

  • Round bulls-eye windows as well as bay windows were popular.

external image Ivanhoe-Timber-Fence-Posts-Gates-Verandah-Arches--w963h480--cr--w963h405.jpg

4. Bay Windows

Ornate bay and (wider) bow windows at Auld Reekie, 511 Royal Parade Parkville, Vic. Their external view is illustrated below.
Ornate bay and (wider) bow windows at Auld Reekie, 511 Royal Parade Parkville, Vic. Their external view is illustrated below.

 

  • ‘Auld Reekie’ is of architectural significance to the State of Victoria.
    ‘Auld Reekie’ is architecturally significant as intact example of an Edwardian era villa in the so-called Federation Queen Anne style.
  • This style, arguably one of the first distinctive Australian architectural styles, is illustrated by the elaborate roof detailing, picturesque appearance and materials of red brick and terra cotta tiles.
Auld Reekie, 511 Royal Parade Parkville
Auld Reekie, 511 Royal Parade Parkville

 

5. French Doors

  • A French door is a door style consisting of a frame around one or more transparent and/or translucent panels (called windows or lights) that may be installed singly, in matching pairs, or even as series.
    French doors at Carramah, 31 Canterbury Road Camberwell Vic, by Architects Ussher and Kemp
    French doors at Carramah, 31 Canterbury Road Camberwell Vic, by Architects Ussher and Kemp
  • French doors have a purpose beyond style. The windows in the door allow more light to enter a room.This was important in a time before the discovery of electricity, as it allowed people to have light in their homes for a longer part of the day.
  • Light could be admitted to hallways and interior rooms that had no other window
  • See also Cosy Federation Interiors

5. Fireplaces

Launceston, Tasmania: Manor house fireplace, Harrap house two fireplaces
Launceston, Tasmania: Manor house fireplace, Harrap house two fireplaces

 

Cosy Federation sitting room at Travancore, 608 Riversdale Rd Camberwell (1899)
Cosy Federation sitting room at Travancore, 608 Riversdale Rd Camberwell (1899)

 


Edwardian fireplace at 18 Kintore Street Camberwell, Vic.
Edwardian fireplace at 18 Kintore Street Camberwell, Vic.

 

  • The Federation or Edwardian fireplace rejected Victorian styles and fireplace practices (Victorian fireplaces were not efficient).

  • As the Federation house expressed a desire for informality, fireplaces were often moved to the corner of a room, or situated in cosy nooks and bays.
  • The fireside inglenook created an informal area for reading and conversation.
  • See also Federation Fireplaces and Cosy Federation Interiors
Arts and Crafts interior at 'Susquahana' 162 Cross Road, Malvern, S.A.
Arts and Crafts interior at ‘Susquahana’ 162 Cross Road, Malvern, S.A.
Inglenook fireplace at 'Strathearn', 8 Stanhope Grove, Camberwell, Victoria
Inglenook fireplace at ‘Strathearn’, 8 Stanhope Grove, Camberwell, Victoria
Carefully detailed Edwardian style timber joinery at 15 Currajong Avenue, Camberwell, Vic 3124
Carefully detailed Edwardian style timber joinery at 15 Currajong Avenue, Camberwell, Vic 3124

6. Federation Bathrooms

  • In an Edwardian bathroom, there’s tile across the whole floor and tile or wainscotting half or a third of the way up the wall to make the surfaces easy to clean, and the walls above topped with light pastel colors or floral patterns.
  • Empty corners and open spaces were the rule, with only as much exposed plumbing as was expressly needed to fill a Clawfoot Tub and feed the Console Sink and toilet.
  • Edwardian bathrooms, as with the rest of Edwardian architecture, utilized lots of natural light, so there’re lots of large windows, light pastel color schemes, and often bouquets of fresh flowers to emphasize the bright, natural aspect of the bathroom.
Period bathroom at 15 Currajong Avenue Camberwell VIC 3124
Period bathroom at 15 Currajong Avenue Camberwell VIC 3124

 

Original Federation style bathroom with modern shower and tap ware.
Original Federation style bathroom with modern shower and tap ware.

 


 

Houses Referenced as Great Works of Federation Art:

(in order of appearance above)

Edzell, 76 St Georges Road Toorak Victoria;

The Gables Mansion and Gardens, 15 Finch St, Malvern East VIC 3145

  • See also Architects Ussher and Kemp
  • NOT a Heritage Listed Location (Why Not?); The Gables is a notable domestic example of the (Queen Anne) Gothic Revival style by architects Ussher and Kemp,
  • No detail has been spared in the maintenance of this century-old residence, from the stained glass windows and open fireplaces, to the classic furnishings and elegant period detailing.
  • Built in 1902 by local property developer Lawrence Alfred Birchnell. The Gables is considered one of the most prominent houses in the Gascoigne and Waverley Estates. Renowned Queen Anne architects Ussher and Kemp celebrate Australian flora and fauna in the intricate plasterwork and leadlight throughout the mansion. William Guilfoyl the master landscape architect of the Royal Botanical Gardens designed the garden which retains much of it original structure today.

Lugano, 17 Victoria Square Ashfield NSW;

Kira, 27 Balwyn Road, Camberwell, Victoria

Booloominbah by John Horbury Hunt, UNE Armidale NSW;

  • See also Architect John Horbury Hunt; Tourist attraction;
  • Heritage Listed Location; Booloominbah was designed for Frederick Robert White in about 1882 by John Horbury Hunt and built by local building contractors William Seabrook and John Brown in 1888. The White family occupied the house until 1933. Booloominbah reflects the Gothic revivalist influences of the ‘Queen Anne’ style. Wikipedia listing.

Manor House, 36 Lyttleton Street East Launceston Tasmania;

  • Launceston Heritage listed as ‘Victoria League House’; built in 1905 by J. & T. Gunn; Recent listing; On Register of Twentieth Century Launceston Architecture; external Heritage data sheet; Listed on Register of Tasmanian architecture – Australian Institute of Architects
  • Sold by private treaty 03 February 2015 for $1,140,000; Gallery of photos;
  • Architect: J. Martyn Haenke; One of Haenke’s finest buildings. The major internal space is a large open two storey high hall with stair and chimney inglenook at the base, which finds its external expression in the squat turret which penetrates the hipped roof. The exterior displays a wonderful fluidly detailed verandah, echoed in the original front fence.
  • SHOULD be Nationally Heritage Registered. SHOULD be listed by the National Trust.
  • See also Launceston Federation Houses

Harrap House, now Egremont 20 Welman Street, Launceston TAS.

  • designed for the Harrap family (Ada, May, and brother George) by J Martyn Haenke;
  • now operating as Egremont Bed And Breakfast;
  • Tasmanian Heritage Register #4696; SHOULD be listed by the National Trust.

Travancore 608 Riversdale Road, Camberwell, Victoria. 3124;

Lenoma, 7 Chrystobel Crescent Hawthorn, Victoria;

  • previously Heritage listed; constructed around 1915 at the end of the second phase of Grace Park development;
  • see Hawthorn Federation Heritage; Last Advertised Price : December 2007, In excess of $5.2 Million
  • possibly designed by Christopher Cowper.
  • “This gracious six bedroom and study Federation residence c1910 is a grand two-level domain of rich original charm and light with street and parkland frontage in the exclusive heart of the prestigious Grace Park Estate”
  • See also Picturesque Queen Anne, Top Federation Houses

Hollowforth, 146 Kurraba Road, Kurraba Point, NSW 2089,

Trevenna UNE Armidale NSW, by John Horbury Hunt;

  • Trevenna is the residence of the Vice-Chancellor of the University of New England, in Armidale, New South Wales, Australia. The house was built in 1892.
  • See also Architect John Horbury Hunt

Officer House, 55 Outlook Drive Eaglemont Victoria;

4 Elsmere Street East Launceston;

Little Milton, 26 Albany Road, Toorak, Melbourne, Victoria;

Amalfi 2 Appian Way, Burwood, NSW;

Rokeby, 78 Athelstan Road Camberwell Victoria;

  • Boroondara City heritage listed; Victorian Heritage listed HO369
  • See also Camberwell heritage

Blackwood 13 Kasouka Road, Camberwell, Victoria;

15 Currajong Avenue Camberwell VIC 3124; old listing;

Susquahana 162 Cross Road, Malvern SA; listed for $1,5m
Earlsferry House and Grounds 1A Nurstead Ave, Bassendean, W.A.

  • W.A. State Registered Place Heritage Place No. 128

Derry, 12 Phillips Street, Neutral Bay, NSW 2089

  • former home of May Gibbs; as the house where May Gibbs wrote Gumnut Babies 1916 and Snugglepot and Cuddlepie 1918, ‘Derry’ is particularly important.
  • Heritage Registered in NSW

Cremorne, 34 Mullens Street, Hamilton, City of Brisbane,Queensland

  • Sold by private treaty 18 December 2015price undisclosed, but reported as asking for “$7m plus”
  • Cremorne was designed by the Sydney architects Eaton & Bates and built from 1905
  • Cremorne was added to the Queensland Heritage Register on 21 October 1992.
  • The front elevation is dominated by a deep, open verandah with large rotundas or pavilions at the southwest and southeast corners, which take advantage of the views and river breezes. This verandah has simple timber valances, posts and balusters, and the rotundas have ogee-shaped cupolas above a frieze of pink and green glass panels
  • Offered for sale for the second time in its 110 year history, this iconic estate originally built in 1905, has the elegant heritage exterior of a Queenslander but inside, the home has received a complete contemporary restoration and heritage approved pavilion extension.
  • Receiving the 2009 State Residential Architecture Houses Award, its exquisite internal features include stained glass windows, 13 foot high ceilings, three fireplaces, chandeliers and polished timber flooring.

Monterey Federation Apartments, 1 Avenue Road MOSMAN, NSW

  • Heritage Registered in NSW
  • “The Monterey” was built in the early 1900s as a private waterside residence and guesthouse. Falling into dereliction, the mansion was completely restored and turned into a restaurant and residence, eventually being converted into 5 luxury strata apartments in the 1980s.

Kianga, New South Head Rd, Vaucluse, NSW

Werona, 33 Trevallyn Road, Trevallyn, Tas 7250;

Braemar, 36 Currajong Avenue, Camberwell, Victoria; old listing

Chadwick House 32-34 The Eyrie, Eaglemont, Victoria,

Coomaroo, 63A Albany Road Toorak, Victoria

46 Bowen Crescent Carlton North 3054;

Vermont, 16 Adelaide Street, East Launceston. Tasmania;

Carramah, 31 Canterbury Road, Camberwell, Victoria;

Auld Reekie, 511 Royal Parade Parkville, Victoria;

Talarno c1890 18 Kintore Street Camberwell, Victoria;

Strathearn 18 Stanhope Grove, Camberwell, Victoria; old listing


Great Australian Federation Architects referenced


  1. ^ http://www.athomeinnorthsydney.com.au/federation–english-revival.html
  2. ^ http://www.antiquehome.org/Architectural-Style/tudor.htm
  3. ^ http://www.antiquehome.org/Architectural-Style/tudor.htm
  4. ^ http://www.athomeinnorthsydney.com.au/federation–english-revival.html
  5. ^ ‘The Federation House, Australia’s Own Style’ by Fraser and Joyce

Art Nouveau Homes

Art Nouveau decoration in Federation Houses

 

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This post features two similar Federation Queen Anne homes, one in St Kilda, Victoria, the other in Scottsdale, Tasmania.

  • Both being constructed of timber, rather than in red brick, they are described in Victoria as ‘Edwardian’. (Queen Anne style usually featured red brick front walls)
  • Their decorative influence is the epitome of Art Nouveau decoration in domestic Australian architecture.
  • Being so elaborately decorated, they represent the last flourish of Queen Anne style in Australian domestic housing design.
Art Nouveau Stamped brass fingerplate
Art Nouveau Stamped brass fingerplate

 

external image image2%252520269%252520Barkly%252520Street%252520St%252520Kilda%252520Vic%2525203182.jpg
Timber Edwardian in St Kilda sold last Saturday 28 Nov 15 for $2,311,000
Timber Edwardian in St Kilda sold last Saturday 28 Nov 15 for $2,311,000

Art Nouveau is a decorative style easily recognised by its sinuous, curvilinear forms often based on the exaggeration of vines, flowers and foliage.

  • A reaction to academic art of the 19th century, Art Nouveau was inspired by natural forms and structures, not only in flowers and plants, but also in curved lines.
  • Architects tried to harmonize with the natural environment.[1]
  • Art Nouveau is considered a “total” art style, embracing architecture, graphic art, interior design, and most of the decorative arts including jewellery, furniture, textiles, household silver and other utensils and lighting, as well as the fine arts.
  • According to the philosophy of the Art Nouveau style, art should be a way of life.
  • In Australia, Art Nouveau was spread by the growth of art and craft education in technical schools and adopted by various commercial enterprises but it was rarely used for complete room or building schemes. [2]
    This fully restored 1910 Scottsdale home sold on 25 November 2015 for over $449,000.
    This fully restored 1910 Scottsdale home sold on 25 November 2015 for over $449,000.
  • Architecture, decorative art, household furnishings and fittings of many types were adapted by designers into the Art Nouveau style.

Leadlight glass in Art Nouveau style

Leadlight glass and timber designs at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182
Leadlight glass and timber designs at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182

 

  • “At auction on 28-Nov-2015 a family won a St Kilda lifestyle in a handsome timber Edwardian house with three bedrooms, three bathrooms, first-floor retreat and wine cellar.
  • But they faced two other bidders for 269 Barkly Street, and paid Wilson Agents’ Niels Geraerts​ $2,311,000, $171,000 over reserve.”
Leadlight glass at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182
Leadlight glass at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182

 

Design for stained glass in Art Nouveau style (Lyongrun plate A 3), from: Arnold Lyongrun, Berlin 1900
Design for stained glass in Art Nouveau style (Lyongrun plate A 3), from: Arnold Lyongrun, Berlin 1900

 

Leadlight glass windows at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182
Leadlight glass windows at 269 Barkly Street St Kilda Vic 3182

 

Timber fretwork in Art Nouveau style

Federation homes are known for their often exuberant timber ornamental decorations: friezes, fretwork, balustrades, art nouveau- style swirled brackets and arch.

Omar, Scottsdale Tas built 1904
Omar, Scottsdale Tas built 1904
Interior Art Nouveau arch at 52 King Street, Scottsdale TAS 7260
Interior Art Nouveau arch at 52 King Street, Scottsdale TAS 7260
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Art Nouveau arch at Scottsdale, note Wunderlich metal ceiling in floral design
Art Nouveau arch at Scottsdale, note Wunderlich metal ceiling in floral design

 

Alistair Brae Pymble
Alistair Brae Pymble
Werona Bed and Breakfast Launceston Tasmania
Werona Bed and Breakfast Launceston Tasmania

Centennial Park Art Nouveau

Centennial Park is a small residential suburb, on the western fringe of the Centennial parkland, which is part of the local government area of the City of Sydney.

  • The suburb developed as a result of a decision to sell off land adjacent to the park to raise money for the park development. One hundred and one acres of land were subdivided in 1904.
  • To ensure high standards of residential development, certain requirements were imposed. No wooden buildings or terrace homes were allowed; brick or stone were mandated, with tile or slate roofs.
  • Between 1905 and 1925, a wide range of substantial, quality homes were built, featuring a mixture of Federation, Arts and Crafts, Victorian and Old English styles. Homes are centred mainly on Martin Road, Robertson Road, Lang Road and Cook Road.[3]
70A Cook Rd Centennial Park NSW
70A Cook Rd Centennial Park NSW
28 Lang Road Centennial Park NSW
28 Lang Road Centennial Park NSW
Art Nouveau Leadlight glass at 74 Lang Road Centennial Park
Art Nouveau Leadlight glass at 74 Lang Road Centennial Park
Ceiling at 100 Lang Road Centennial Park  NSW
Ceiling at 100 Lang Road Centennial Park NSW
Leadlight at Centennial Park, built in in the early 1900's
Leadlight at Centennial Park, built in in the early 1900’s
Beautiful Art Nouveau Leadlight glass at 39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
Beautiful Art Nouveau Leadlight glass at 39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW
39 Robertson Road Centennial Park NSW

Art Nouveau Furnishings

An eclectic mixture, beginning with Australian pieces

Australian interior from "The Federation House" by Hugh Fraser and Ray Joyce
Australian interior from “The Federation House” by Hugh Fraser and Ray Joyce
The Robert Prenzel wardrobe
The Robert Prenzel wardrobe
French Art Nouveau chair with gilt wood frame
French Art Nouveau chair with gilt wood frame
Belgian oak Art Nouveau display sideboard
Belgian oak Art Nouveau display sideboard
Austrian Art Nouveau mahogany dressing table
Austrian Art Nouveau mahogany dressing table
Arts and Crafts Oak Hallstand by Shapland and Petter c1905
Arts and Crafts Oak Hallstand by Shapland and Petter c1905
ART NOUVEAU DISPLAY CABINET IN MAHOGANY
ART NOUVEAU DISPLAY CABINET IN MAHOGANY
Art Nouveau bookcase
Art Nouveau bookcase
tiled-top-AC-table
tiled-top-AC-table
Edwardian walnut display cabinet sideboard
Edwardian walnut display cabinet sideboard

 

Wall and ceiling designs

Art Nouveau interior design comes as a combination of artistic decorative baroque with modern and contemporary details.
Its characteristics are sweeping, feminine shapes. Its beauty is undeniable and a lot of people love it.

1907 English Art Nouveau Wall and ceiling designs
1907 English Art Nouveau Wall and ceiling designs

22 Classy Art Nouveau Interior Design Ideas
22 Classy Art Nouveau Interior Design Ideas
22 Classy Art Nouveau Interior Design Ideas
22 Classy Art Nouveau Interior Design Ideas

 

A delightful Federation Lounge room with original fireplaces and ceilings. Sherwood, circa 1910, 307 Mowbray Road Artarmon
A delightful Federation Lounge room with original fireplaces and ceilings. Sherwood, circa 1910, 307 Mowbray Road Artarmon

  1. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Nouveau
  2. ^http://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/exhibitions/art-nouveau
  3. ^ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centennial_Park,_New_South_Wales

Shingle styles in Australia

All about the Shingle Style

[Previous Post: Dalvui, Terang, Vic … ]

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Shingle Style

Hollowforth2.jpg
Hollowforth, 146 Kurraba Rd Neutral Bay NSW

 

Kragsyde, Manchester-by-the-Sea
Kragsyde, Manchester-by-the-Sea

The William Berryman Scott House(1888), designed by A. Page Brown, at 56 Bayard Lane,Princeton, New Jerseyin the Princeton Historic District

The Shingle Style in America was made popular by the rise of the New England school of architecture, which eschewed the highly ornamented patterns of the Eastlake style.
[In architecture the Eastlake Style is part of the Queen Anne style of Victorian architecture.]

In the Shingle Style, English influence was combined with the renewed interest in Colonial American architecture which followed the 1876 celebration of the Centennial.

  • Architects emulated colonial houses’ plain, shingled surfaces as well as their massing,
  • whether in the simple gable of McKim Mead and White’s Low House or
  • in the complex massing of Kragsyde, which looked almost as if a colonial house had been fancifully expanded over many years.
  • This impression of the passage of time was enhanced by the use of shingles.
William Berryman Scott House(1888)
William Berryman Scott House(1888)

Kragsyde, Manchester-by-the-Sea, Massachusetts (1883, demolished 1929),Peabody and Stearns, architects.

The Shingle Style conveyed a sense of the house as continuous volume. This effect—of the building as an envelope of space, rather than a great mass, was enhanced by

 

  • the visual tautness of the flat shingled surfaces,
  • the horizontal shape of many shingle style houses, and
  • the emphasis on horizontal continuity, both in exterior details and in the flow of spaces within the houses.

McKim, Mead and White and Peabody and Stearns were two of the notable American firms of the era that helped to popularize the Shingle Style, through their large-scale commissions for “seaside cottages” of the rich and the well-to-do in such places as Newport, Rhode Island.

  • The most famous Shingle Style house built in America was “Kragsyde” (1882), the summer home commissioned by Bostonian G. Nixon Black, from Peabody and Stearns.
  • Kragsyde was built atop the rocky coastal shore near Manchester-By-the-Sea, Massachusetts, and embodied every possible tenet of the Shingle style.

Many of the concepts of the Shingle Style were adopted by Gustav Stickley, and adapted to the American version of the Arts and Crafts Movement.

Shingles had been a traditional roof covering in northern Europe, and in England in particular, and they were used in Australia from the first years of settlement, although they were no longer current in England itself.

  • In the United States the word ‘shake’ was used of a rough split shingle, from the Elizabethan verb meaning to split or crack, which had remained in use in the southern Appalachians, whereas in New England shingles were ‘riven’.
Booloominbah Armidale
Booloominbah Armidale

The Shingle Style 1880 – 1900

The Shingle Style originated in New England in the 1880s and and became popular across the whole of the United States by the beginning of the next decade, the 1890s.

  • Like the Richardsonian Romanesque and the Queen Anne, it is a genuine American vernacular style of the late 19th-century. It was historian Vincent Scully who in the 1950s identified and named this style, which appears to be a reaction to the excesses of the Victorian and the Queen Anne Styles.
  • The Shingle Style avoided fussy effects and complex wall surfaces and textures in favor of a uniform wall covering of wood shingles, reducing and distilling them to bare essentials and forms like early colonial houses.
  • The style was an early manifestation of a ‘colonial revival architecture’ that emulated the New England ‘colonial houses’ plain, shingled surfaces as well as their massing.

 

Oliver T. Sherwood House, Southport Connecticut by Henry Hobson Richardson.
Oliver T. Sherwood House, Southport Connecticut by Henry Hobson Richardson.

In Victorian days, shingles were often used as ornamentation on houses on Queen Anne and other highly decorated styles. But American architects Henry Hobson Richardson, Charles McKim, Stanford White, and even Frank Lloyd Wright began to experiment with shingle siding (on walls).
Also known as ‘seaside style’, the Shingle style is not that common outside New England and never gained the wide popularity of its contempora
external image images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSn27iJRWGLGIfLYdxmyZAaU_wo_KKozeW_pH-xeHfJnRt3kZRL
ry, the Queen Anne style.

  • But since it started among the higher and fashionable social circles, it was well publicized in contemporary architectural magazines.
  • The style spread throughout the country on a limited basis, and scattered examples are found today in most areas of the country.

Architect Henry Hobson Richardson is credited with designing and building the first Shingle house prototype, the Sherman House of Newport, Rhode Island in 1876. (see above)

The Shingle revival in Australia

from: Miles Lewis: Australian Building
In New South Wales John Horbury Hunt used shingles for the roof of St Peter’s Cathedral, Armidale, which might be considered somewhat primitive. But this was a grand and sophisticated brick church, and the choice of shingles must have had more to do with the British medieval tradition and the ideals of the Arts and Crafts movement, and Hunt used shingles frequently in the period 1870-90.

Highlands_024-640w.jpg
The Highlands was completed in the 1890s as a private residence for Alfred Hordern.

Shingle style in the period 1870-90.

Shingles enjoyed a more general revival in Australia in the 1880s, in response to the shingle style of the United States, but they were generally imported rather than locally produced.

  • Soon these shingles were being used as a wall cladding.
  • Hunt used American red cedar shingles on the tennis pavilion at ‘Baroona’, Wittingham, and probably elsewhere.
  • In 1888 the Melbourne architect L J Flannagan completely sheathed the carcase of Richard Shann’s house ‘Mendip Hills’, North Preston, in boarding and had nailed to it 13 mm thick Californian red pine shingles of fish scale pattern.

 

House for R. Shann at ‘Mendip Hills’, North Preston, by L. J. Flannagan, 1887.
House for R. Shann at ‘Mendip Hills’, North Preston, by L. J. Flannagan, 1887.

In 1892 Guyon Purchas proposed a shingle roof to be laid over corrugated iron for ‘Boisdale’ homestead, Victoria, though in the event French Marseilles tiles were used instead.

  • The proto-modern Strathfield NSW architect G S Jones used American redwood shingles with tile ridging on the roof of a house in Strathfield, Sydney, in 1894.81
  • A little later, at the neighbouring house ‘Bickley’ (now demolished), he hung redwood shingles over the upper part of the brick walls, and used split oak shingles on the roof.

 

“Arnottholme” 65-67 Albert Road Strathfield with shingle-hung upper walls
“Arnottholme” 65-67 Albert Road Strathfield with shingle-hung upper walls

In 1906 Howard Joseland, a devotee of the Arts and Crafts, favoured silver-grey shingles in combination with roughcast, red brick, brown painted verandah woodwork and blue-green eaves,

  • but by now G S Jones had changed his mind, and attacked the idea of ‘shingles tacked in one place, a patch of stucco adjoining, together with some fantastic shapes in woodwork and some coloured brickwork thrown about’ as indicating ‘the restless spirit of the owner as well as the designer’.

 

Joseland's design: 'Midhope' (St Edmund's School), Burns Road, Wahroonga
Joseland’s design: ‘Midhope’ (St Edmund’s School), Burns Road, Wahroonga

 

'Vallambrosa' 19 Appian Way - Queen Anne style , with Arts and Crafts features, shingles in gable
‘Vallambrosa’ 19 Appian Way – Queen Anne style , with Arts and Crafts features, shingles in gable

However, shingles long remained a feature of Arts and Crafts design, especially in Western Australia where they had made their first appearance later than in the east.

  • Examples include some cottages in Malcolm Street, West Perth, demolished in 1991,85 and at least three houses built or altered by William Williams, each with the upper floor shingle clad.
  • Williams built one at 9 Brae Road, Claremont, in 1918, and altered another at 24 Reserve Street, at about the same time:
    his own house at 16 Aggett Street, though alleged to date from 1905,87 must in reality have been finished at about the same time.

 

Milton Park Bowral NSW
Milton Park Bowral NSW

Meanwhile ‘Redwood’, the imported Californian bungalow of 1915-17, promoted in Sydney by Richard Stanton & Son, had a redwood shingle roof, and so, it appears, did some of the bungalows which followed.[1]

What Makes a Shingled Style House?

The Shingle style rejects excessive decoration and embellishment and seeks instead the effect of a complex shape enclosed within a smooth (wood shingle) surface. It is the wall of shingles which unifies the irregular outline of the house. In Shingle style houses decorative detailing, when present, is used sparingly. The style emphasizes the volumetric spaces within the house more so than exterior surface details.

In Shingle style houses the walls appear as thin, light membranes shaped by the space they enclosed. The effect is heightened by bulging segmental bays or half round turrets jutting out from the body of the houses rather than as fully developed elements. At times the shingled walls seem thinner and lighter when contrasted with a basement floor of rubble masonry or fieldstone.

Travenna, Armidale 1889, Trevenna Road, University of New England, Armidale
Travenna, Armidale 1889, Trevenna Road, University of New England, Armidale

Roofs are usually of gentle pitch with extensive gables; in two-story houses the roofs even go down and out to the ground-floor level harking back to lean-tos found in 17th century New England saltbox houses.

  • The gambrel roof is more common than the hipped.
  • Chimneys are generally less obstrusive, conforming to the prevailing horizontality of the Shingle house.

The Shingle style does borrows some features from the Queen Anne style: wide porches, shingled surfaces, and asymmetrical forms.

  • But the architects who designed the Shingle, favored opening up the interior space but with few rooms.
  • The rooms, however, were a lot bigger in size making sunlight easier to reach in and light the interior.
“Highlands” was built in 1892‐93 for Alfred Horden and his wife,
“Highlands” was built in 1892‐93 for Alfred Horden and his wife,

Shingle style’s Identifying Features

  • Houses are generally two or three stories tall
  • House spreads low and anchors to ground on a heavy stone foundation
  • Weight, density, and permanence are emphasized and articulated
Front_view_Gables_C17_C1768.jpg
The Gables, in Spruson Street by BJ Waterhouse 1920

The following images are from the post Architect E. Jeaffreson Jackson:
• Dark and rough-hewn stone masonry
• Asymmetrical volumes in the form of cross gables and roof sections of different pitch, wings, turrets, bays, and oriels
• Shingles in many colors, such as the Indian reds, olive greens and deep yellows

"A sensational, large, turbulent house, with towering chimneys and swirling shingles" Hollowforth, 146 Kurraba Rd Neutral Bay NSW
“A sensational, large, turbulent house, with towering chimneys and swirling shingles” Hollowforth, 146 Kurraba Rd Neutral Bay NSW

• Shingles form a continuous and contoured covering, stretching over roof lines and around corners
• Sweep of the roof may continue to the first floor level providing cover for porches, or is steeply pitched and multi-planed

9-11 Mans Avenue Neutral Bay
9-11 Mans Avenue Neutral Bay

• Entries defined by heavy (often low) arches

House 17 Calypso Avenue Mosman
House 17 Calypso Avenue Mosman

• Columns are short and stubby
• Wide porches
• Broad gables

The Hastings, 2 Hayes Street, Neutral Bay, NSW
The Hastings, 2 Hayes Street, Neutral Bay, NSW

• Small casement and sash windows which may have many lights, and often are grouped into twos or threes

 17 Calypso Avenue Mosman
17 Calypso Avenue Mosman

• An “eyebrow” dormer is distinctive
• Free-flowing interior
• Large rooms and porches loosely arranged around an open “great hall,” dominated by a grand staircase.

28 Mistral Avenue Mosman Mosman
28 Mistral Avenue Mosman Mosman

“Large, two-storey rambling Inter-War Arts & Crafts house. The ground floor is in face brick, the upper level in timber shingles and the roof of terracotta. Features include bay windows, hoods and small pane windows.”
Tulkiyan.jpg

Shingle Style Interiors

Freedom and openness characterize the Shingle style interior. The focal point is a living hall complete with fireplace, which is a feature inherited from the English Queen Anne houses.

Tulkiyan Staircase | Sydney Living Museums
Tulkiyan Staircase | Sydney Living Museums

 

  • The main stairs often rise from the living hall, around which one finds other reception rooms.
  • These rooms are often entered through wide openings with sliding doors, so that the whole area could be made into a single, subdivided space.
Tulkiyan, Gordon NSW
Tulkiyan, Gordon NSW

 

  • Verandas and porches are integral parts of the plan; not attached, as in Romanesque or Queen Anne houses.

external image Tulkiyan_House.jpg?w=560&h=600

  • Wood paneling predominates in the main rooms. In fine houses it might be raised-panel mahogany to the ceiling, oak in other houses, and in more modest seaside Shingle cottages, battens or beadboard paneling.
Tulkiyan Dining Room | Sydney Living Museums
Tulkiyan Dining Room | Sydney Living Museums

 

From page on Gordon Heritage

TULKIYAN, Gordon NSW

Tulkiyan is of State significance as an important, intact example of a fine Arts & Crafts suburban villa
Tulkiyan is of State significance as an important, intact example of a fine Arts & Crafts suburban villa

Tulkiyan2.png

Tulkiyan House Museum
Tulkiyan House Museum

Tulkiyan is an Arts & Crafts style suburban villa designed in 1913 by architect B.J. (Bertrand James) Waterhouse (1876-1965) of Waterhouse & Lake Architects.
The house was built for Mrs Mary Donaldson and her husband William, a Sydney merchant. It remained in Donaldson family ownership and occupation for 80 years, with minimal alterations to furnishings and building fabric. When the last of the family, Miss Mary Donaldson, died in 1994 aged 91, Tulkiyan became the property of Ku-Ring-Gai Council.
As a house museum, Tulkiyan illustrates the early 20th century fashion, taste and lifestyle of an Edwardian family on the affluent upper North Shore of Sydney. The largely intact interior is furnished with most of the original contents of the house. Furniture bought from David Jones in 1913 was simply updated in 1930 through the replacement of worn carpets and a re-covering of dining chairs.The original front garden layout also remains, along with remnants of early plantings, including lily pilly trees on either side of the main gate. Tulkiyan’s asymmetrical form, gables, shingle roof, wall finishes and bay windows are also typical of the period and the dark stained timber joinery of the interiors, decorative plaster ceilings and Art Nouveau style gas fireplaces are all synonymous with the Arts and Crafts architectural style.


external image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_003.jpg?itok=F1WuuO22

  • Photographer:James Whitelock
  • Date Photographed:March 1990
  • Original image format:35mm mounted slides
  • Copyright:Caroline Simpson Library & Research Collection, Photograph James Whitelock, (c) Sydney Living Museums

Built in 1913, Tulkiyan is an important example of the work of Bertrand J Waterhouse, a prominent Sydney architect. In Federations arts and crafts style, it displays asymmetrical, dominant gables; shingled roof and wall finishes; and bay windows. The interior includes elaborate plaster ceilings, Art Nouveau style gas fireplaces and built-in cupboards – an innovation at the time.

The Donaldson family lived in the house continuously for over 80 years from 1913, during which the original style was maintained. The home and its contents provide an insight into upper middle class life in Sydney during the first half of the 20th century.

Tulkiyan was built for Mary and William Donaldson and their three children, Mary Isobella, William Jnr and Margaret.

external image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_003b.jpg?itok=hoVIbimITulkiyan was built on part of the 40 acres of land that had been granted to Michael Ansell on 30 June 1823. In 1824, the 40 acres was sold to William Fowler, who then leased it to Messrs. Giles and
external image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_008.jpg?itok=FnjMYiXN
Ritchie. It was further mortgaged to Samuel Lyons, an auctioneer, who, in 1843, finally disposed of the property to Robert McIntosh II who was already a landowner and occupier of other substantial properties in old Lane Cove.

  • The house is designed in the Federation Arts and Crafts style by B. J. Waterhouse. Tulkiyan is an important intact example of Waterhouse’s work. The house is asymmetrical with an all embracing roof line covering balconies and verandahs. All major rooms downstairs and bedrooms upstairs have access to verandahs and sleeping out was ‘an activity seen as being conducive to health’. Tulkiyan means ‘gable’ in Gaelic (Anthony, 2008, 1).

external image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_010.jpg?itok=1h_Ichln

  • As in Waterhouse’s other domestic designs, the dominant, all embracing roof is a considerable technical achievement dominating the building. It broods over the general mass of the house unifying all its separate parts. Waterhouse wrote:
  • ‘The cast shadow on rough cast or brick broken by the light on glass and shutter is most beautiful, and the unifying value of the shadow is very greatexternal image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_005.jpg?itok=NYKdq-F_
  • Balconies and verandahs should either be absorbed within the structural bounding lines of the mass, or be large enough to avoid that meagre and disjointed appearance so detrimental to the design, and should provide sufficient space for living or sleeping and out accommodation now so customary.’
  • external image COL_CSLRC_TulkiyanGordon_004.jpg?itok=rvUYg5OIThe principal wall material unlike many of Waterhouse’s contemporary designs is a dark mahogany/brown brick combined with beautiful red/brown plane tiles and gables which are heavily half-timbered and pargetted with rough cast.
  • Interestingly, Waterhouse was to choose a similar brick when he built his own house ‘The Gables’ in Neutral Bay – between 1920-23. The tall chimneys have their own gabled roofs and are almost a trademark of a Waterhouse design from this period. The large semi-circular arch which defined the front verandah of Tulkiyan echoes a favourite architectural motif of the great American architect, Henry Hobson Richardson.

The Shingle style, unlike the earlier Victorian aesthetics which preceded it, was an unusually free-form and variable style. One reason for the range in variety is the that it had originated and remained primarily a high-fashion style designed by architects for the wealthy rather than becoming, like the Queen Anne, adapted for housing among all social classes of Americans.


Shingle Style Houses on the National Heritage Register


References


  1. ^

    Miles Lewis: Australian Building 2.05 – http://www.mileslewis.net/australian-building/pdf/02-timber-grass/2.05-shingles.pdf

Generational Federation houses

Quality, long-held Federation properties in Melbourne

[Previous Post: Church Street, Pymble … Next Post: ],

Generational’ houses enter property market

“Melbourne is about to see a rush of residential listings for high-end “generational” properties as a large number of tightly-held homes are offered for sale.

“Many of these properties – including a prime Kew residence held by one family for 99 years – are in the inner-eastern suburbs, where prestige listings are on a roll.

  • Kay & Burton director Scott Patterson said there had been a big rise in the number of quality, long-held properties being listed for sale in October and November compared to previous spring real estate markets.
  • “It’s being spurred on by the confidence people have in the property market,” he said”

Inveresk, 11 Sackville Street, Kew

  • “I have listed a house at 11 Sackville Street, Kew – it has been in the same family for nearly 100 years and never had another owner.
11 Sackville St, Kew has been held by one family for 97 years. Photo: Supplied
11 Sackville St, Kew has been held by one family for 97 years. Photo: Supplied

“I have (also) listed one in (78) Wattle Road, Hawthorn, which has been in the one family for 60 years.

  • “These are generational properties and I have never seen so many of them coming up.”
  • Sackville Street is a stone’s throw from Carey Grammar, Genazzano and other top-tier private schools.
  • Three generations of the Eady family have lived in the cavernous, circa-1916 Federation-style “Inveresk” at Number 11, which is across the road from Carey Baptist Grammar, near Wrixon Street.
  • The home has six bedrooms and occupies a 2,763-square-metre site.
Inveresk, 11 Sackville Street, Kew
Inveresk, 11 Sackville Street, Kew

Mr Patterson said the property was in largely original condition. It is expected to sell for more than $8 million at an invitation-only, private auction to be held on Wednesday October 28.


Ethelstane, 44 Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury

  • In Canterbury, Ian Phillips will bid an emotional farewell to his home when it goes to auction next Saturday after being kept in his family for more than 90 years.
Ethelstane, 44 Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury
Ethelstane, 44 Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury
  • The circa-1910 Edwardian has been loved by three generations, and Mr Phillips, 78, lived there for most of his life.
  • He and his wife Ann raised three sons in the house – all of them now have their own families – and are looking to downsize when it sells.
  • Mr Phillips still holds the receipt for the 100-pound deposit his grandfather paid in November 1921 when he bought the four-bedroom house at 44 Wattle Valley Road for 2000 pounds.
Ethelstane, 44 Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury
Ethelstane, 44 Wattle Valley Road, Canterbury

The couple moved to the next street after they married, and came back after they bought “Ethelstane” from Mr Phillip’s mother.

  • “It is a considerable emotional wrench. Everything is so soaked in memories that it is really quite difficult for me personally,” he said.
  • “My favourite climbing tree as a child remains, as does the beech tree I gave my grandmother from my first pay packet – but it is time to move on.”

Araluen, 207 Lennox Street Richmond

  • The eastern suburbs last month got a taste of the confidence of high-end vendors when one of Richmond’s largest properties, Araluen, at 207 Lennox Street, sold for $5.1 million.
  • It was also dispatched to a new owner via an invite-only boardroom auction at the Armadale office of real estate agent Abercromby’s.
  • Araluen, last traded in 1957, is one of Richmond’s earliest built homes. It sits on 1466 square metres on the south-east corner of Goodwood Street, just over a kilometre from the CBD.
 207 Lennox Street Richmond, Photo: Supplied
207 Lennox Street Richmond, Photo: Supplied

Jellis Craig auctioneer Andrew Macmillan said there was no doubt that the inner eastern market was seeing a large amount of generational change.

  • Domain Group senior economist Andrew Wilson said very big listing numbers were being recorded in the inner east.
  • He said many of these properties were higher-priced properties and generational factors could be having a larger impact on listings than was usual.
Araluen, 207 Lennox Street Richmond
Araluen, 207 Lennox Street Richmond
  • With Christina Zhou

external image Amelia-Barnes-headshot-150x150.jpg
Multigenerational Home
Amelia Barnes

Australian empty nesters choosing to live large

2-4 Mangarra Road, Canterbury

Melbourne couple Ruth and Peter McCall are trading in their federation-style home in Canterburyfor an equally large converted community hall in Westgarth following their children moving out of home.

2-4 Mangarra Road, Canterbury
2-4 Mangarra Road, Canterbury
  • “Transitioning into the ’empty nesters’ phase of life doesn’t necessarily mean reducing or compacting your living arrangements or lifestyle, although I understand that for some that’s also quite freeing,” McCall says.
  • “Reconfiguring that space as we are doing by moving from a federation-period home to a renovated community hall allows us to enjoy ‘home’ in a new setting, while not compromising on lifestyle.”
2-4 Mangarra Road, Canterbury
2-4 Mangarra Road, Canterbury
  • The McCall’s new home in Westgarth is a stark contrast to their c1913 home of the past 20 years, with its defined living spaces, period-style interiors and large outdoor living space.
  • The couple will be the first owners to take possession of the converted hall since being renovated for residential use by Melbourne fashion designers of Alpha 60, Alex and Georgie Cleary. The home has featured in numerous design publications and on the Channel Ten television series Offspring.
98 Union Street, Westgarth
98 Union Street, Westgarth
  • “We appreciate the care taken by the outgoing owners Alex and Georgie Cleary who were able to incorporate the integrity of its bones – space, light and rich timber flooring – to offer a creative and flexible space,” McCall says.
  • “Aged in our mid 50s, we enjoy space and the capacity to appreciate our eclectic collection of furniture and artwork and having our sons and friends visit and stay as often as possible,”
external image 967442018.jpg

Pymble Federation Heritage

Heritage Conservation Area, Pymble, NSW

and Federation Heritage in Pymble

[Previous post: Sefton Hall, Mount Wilson … Next post: Telegraph Road, Pymble]

external image 220px-%281%29Pymble_Presbytery.jpg
external image title-deeds-pymble_729-420x0.jpg external image Pymble%252520Post%252520Office%2525201920.jpg
Heritage-listed Sacred Heart Presbytery ‘Abyia’, 23 Church Street Pymble, sold byJacque and Oliver Yates for about $4 million. First Pymble Post Office 1890

external image Pymble%252520Heritage%252520animation.gif

Pymble Conservation Area, Eastern side
Pymble Conservation Area, Eastern side

The Pymble Urban Conservation Precinct consists of an area of single-storey and double storey (1930s and 1940s) houses.
The uniform appearance of the area stems from its well-established landscape.

  • The centrepiece is the housing surrounding Robert Pymble Park. the houses and park constitute an excellent example of good civic design.
  • There are also excellent examples of individual houses of merit, includingCoppins, the Walter Burley Griffin designed house on the corner of Telegraph Road and Graham Avenue.
  • Housing in the area consists predominantly of houses on medium- to large-sized lots. There are a few unsympathetic alterations or intrusions into the area..

The Pymble Precinct epitomises the area and era in both the excellent, intact nature of its houses, their gardens and street plantings.

Redriff, 53 Telegraph Rd, Pymble
Redriff, 53 Telegraph Rd, Pymble
'Redrif' features high, decorative ceilings — another period feature of the home.
‘Redrif’ features high, decorative ceilings — another period feature of the home.
1.21 Station Street.
1.21 Station Street.
1.21 Station Street.
1.21 Station Street.
Colinroobie, Pymble
Colinroobie, Pymble
2009519676_2_FS.jpg
‘Abyia’, 23 Church Street Pymble, built 1901

The Pymble Urban Conservation Precinct is important because:

  1. The area possesses streetscape integrity due to the
    St Swithun's Anglican Church, on Telegraph Road, was built circa 1938
    St Swithun’s Anglican Church, on Telegraph Road, was built circa 1938

    established nature
    of the well landscaped gardens and street planting.

  2. The area has a uniformity of housing style including colour, form and architectural detail that gives the area an harmonious appearance.
  3. The predominance of the 1930s and 1940s housing styles illustrates the important influence of British housing ideals and styles on Australia and the excellent examples of two-storey 1930s and 1940s houses illustrates the increasing affluence and expectations of the middle class.
  4. It reflects the availability of finance enabling the middle class to borrow money and finance the purchase of a house and epitomises the great diversion of funds in Australia from private investment in industry and infrastructure to non-productive investment in private housing.

Significant Pymble houses include:

  • Grandview is a two-storey, Georgian structure made of sandstone. It was built circa 1870 as a bank but is now used as a home. It has a federal heritage listing.[9]Grandview has reverted to private use and is on the Register of the National Estate.
  • Merrivale is a local stately home in the Regency style and is considered one of the finest examples of its kind in Ku-ring-gai. It has a state heritage listing.[5][10]
    Coppins, Telegraph Road Pymble
    Coppins, Telegraph Road Pymble
    Macquarie Cottage, 11 Avon Road, Pymble
    Macquarie Cottage, 11 Avon Road, Pymble
  • Coppins, sometimes known as the Eric Pratten house, was designed by Walter Burley Griffin and built circa 1936. It is one of three large houses designed by Griffin in Ku-ring-gai and is significant because most of his residential buildings were single-storey. It is an example of the Art Deco/Prairie style and has a State Heritage listing.[5][11]
  • Macquarie Cottage, in Avon Road, was designed by William Hardy Wilson and built in 1918.
    Colinroobie, 1 Clydesdale Place Pymble NSW 2073
    Colinroobie, 1 Clydesdale Place Pymble NSW 2073

    It is considered a typical example of Wilson’s work and has both State and Federal heritage listings.[12][13]

  • Sacred Heart Presbytery is a two-storey house in the FederationArts and Crafts style, with Gothictouches to the windows. It was built in 1907 and has a State Heritage listing.[14]
  • Colinroobie, a two-storey Federation mansion built in the early 20th Century, situated at the corner of thePacific Highway and Clydesdale Place. It has a State Heritage listing.[15]
    Featured on page: Federation Beauties

Federation Heritage also Featured on other pages:

Prized estate ... Caryina, 35a - 37 Telegraph Road, Pymble
Prized estate … Caryina, 35a – 37 Telegraph Road, Pymble
Alisterbrae1.jpg
‘Alister Brae’ – c1904 Landmark Residence, 24 King Edward Street Pymble

Lanosa, 62-64 Mona Vale Rd, Pymble

“Heritage enthusiasts have celebrated an interim heritage order placed on one of Pymble’s oldest home with a connection to the controversial opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge.”

  • “The intact Queen Anne or federation-style home and landscaped gardens named Lanosa at 62-64 Mona Vale Rd, was built in 1897 for Charles Martin Buck, one of Pymble’s forefathers and president of the Progress of Pymble Association.
  • “It is perhaps most noted for its connection to an incident at the official opening ceremony of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1934.”
Lanosa in 1920 at the time the Reichard family were in occupation.
Lanosa in 1920 at the time the Reichard family were in occupation.
Lanosa, 1920.
Lanosa, 1920.
Lanosa’s ballroom with vaulted ceiling.
Lanosa’s ballroom with vaulted ceiling.
  • Lanosa was the home of Captain Francis De Groot, member of the New Guard, who rode up and cut the ribbon to open the Sydney Harbour Bridge before the official opening could take place.
  • Lanosa, 1920. The original face brick facades with contrasting brick details are evident. A small porch/ verandah is visible at the junction of the two wings of the building. A chimney is also visible extending above the northern side of the rear wing.
  • Above from the Daily Telegraph; July 1, 2014 1:15pm Danielle Nicastri – North Shore Times

Federation Style and other Heritage in Pymble:


1. Telegraph Road, Pymble

external image Animation_Telegraph_Road_Pymble.gif


2. Mona Vale Road, Pymble

Mona Vale Road runs along a ridge dividing the watershed on the south east via the Pymble Valley to Middle Harbour and north to Cowan Creek towards Broken Bay, and towards the Lane Cove River catchment. It is likely to have been formed in the path of an Aboriginal route. One of the first roads defined as a route to Pitt Water.


3. Church Street, Pymble

Subdivisions leading up to 1890 anticipated the completion of the North Shore Railway line in 1890.

  • The first subdivision of McKeown’s lands, the Roseville Estate, created Roseville Avenue (now Wellesley Road), which extended north from Lane Cove Road to Church Street.
  • A second subdivision created residential lots through to Stoney Creek Road (Mona Vale Road) and from Church Street to a newly defined Hope Street.
  • The grand houses in Church Street, from 19 to 33, all heritage listed with one exception (No. 25-27), form a particularly significant group.
  • The north-western end of Church Street, and the southern side of Church Street between King Edward Street and Wellesley Road contains a significant grouping of heritage items and potential heritage items, and forms a logical extension to the gazetted Pymble Heights HCA.
external image imageDisplay?op=generateWatermarkedImageforFreemium&imageUrl=aHR0cHM6Ly9zdGF0aWMucnBkYXRhLmNvbS9ycGRhQVUvcGhvdG8vbGlzdHNhbGUvNDcweDMxMy8wNC8wNy8xOS9OU1cwMDkzMUMvNDcuSlBH&height=275&width=440
29 Church Street, Pymble
29 Church Street, Pymble
Abyia, 23 Church Street Pymble
Abyia, 23 Church Street Pymble
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external image 16056pht.jpg

4. Grandview Road, Pymble

Everleigh

27 Grandview Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920

27 Grandview Street, Pymble
27 Grandview Street, Pymble
Dwelling

29 Grandview Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920

Item 29 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Item 29 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Ku-ring-gai

35 Grandview Street, Pymble

Altered or extended unsympathetically; Historical period: Pre-1900.

Dwelling

39 Grandview Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920; **Sold for $2,350,000** in Feb 2015
‘1896 Victorian masterpiece’

39 grandview street pymble NSW 2073
39 grandview street pymble NSW 2073
Dwelling

41 Grandview Street, Pymble (1897)

Historical period: 1901-1920; Altered or extended unsympathetically;
Sold for $2,770,000 in 26 Mar 2015 (Auction)

41 Grandview Street, Pymble
41 Grandview Street, Pymble
Pymble Railway Station Group Grandview Street
Pymble railway station has aesthetic significance at a local level as a good example of a standard
design station building in its original context, dating from the 1909 duplication works.
external image Pymble_railway_station_platform_2.jpg
Dahinda

43 Grandview Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920

Dahinda 43 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Dahinda 43 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Willendon

45 Grandview Street, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920

Willendon 45 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Willendon 45 Grandview Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Post Office
external image Pymble%252520Post%252520Office%2525201901.jpg

75 Grandview Street Pymble

external image Pymble%252520Post%252520Office%2525201920.jpg


5. Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

Dwelling 66 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

66 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
66 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Dwelling

75 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

Since subdivided
Reasons for listing; cultural, municipal significance Note: fine garden

Dwelling

78 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920; Altered or extended unsympathetically

Dwelling

80 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920; Sold on 12 Apr 2013 for $2,395,000
external image preview.jpg

80 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble 2073
80 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble 2073
Hamilton Park

104 Livingstone Avenue, Pymble

Recent price $3.3m;
Sold for $1,600,000 in Dec 2007; Sold for $3,150,000 in Mar 2008;
external image w800-h533-2006757206_1_pi_150220_060642


6. Pacific Highway, Pymble

Pymble Pacific Highway
Cottages Group

877,881,1002,1006,1010,1022,1028 Pacific Highway, Pymble

Pymble Pacific Highway Cottages Group 877, 881, 1002, 1006, 1010, 1022, 1028 Pacific Highway, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Pymble Pacific Highway Cottages Group 877, 881, 1002, 1006, 1010, 1022, 1028 Pacific Highway, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Pymble Police Station

1116 Pacific Highway, Pymble

external image The%252520old%252520Pymble%252520Police%252520Station%25252C%252520in%252520use%252520until%2525201994.jpg

Dwelling

1161 Pacific Highway, Pymble

Historical period: 1921-1940. Spanish Mission style

Item 1161 Pacific Highway, PymbleImage by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen ProudfootImage copyright owner: Ku-Ring-Gai Council
Item 1161 Pacific Highway, PymbleImage by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen ProudfootImage copyright owner: Ku-Ring-Gai Council
Dwelling

1163 Pacific Highway, Pymble

Historical period: 1921-1940; Spanish Mission style
**Sold for $916,000** in Mar 2013

Grandview

1178 Pacific Highway, Pymble

“Grandview” – two storey stone residence on Pymble Hill stands on land which was originally part of a 100 acre grant to William Wright made in 1821.

Grandview, 1178 Pacific Highway, Pymble
Grandview, 1178 Pacific Highway, Pymble

* It is one of the oldest buildings in Ku-ring-gai and is over ninety years old.

  • It has dignity and solidarity with its dressed local stone with tooled edges and cast iron balustrades.
  • Was built in the 1880s by Richard Porter and in 1883 ownership passed to his son Michael ( whose 40 acres of orange orchard now comprises the Presbyterian Ladies College and part of Avondale Golf Club).
  • In 1888 “Grandview” became the first bank in the district as the Australian Joint Stock Bank until 1894 and was later used as a private residence (KHS; 1973). Historical period: Pre-1900.

This dignified and high quality stone building is a key element in the streetscape of Pymble Hill.

  • It is historically significant as it housed the first bank in the district.
    Grandview, 1178 Pacific Highway, Pymble
    Grandview, 1178 Pacific Highway, Pymble
  • The house is a symmetrical Georgian revival two storey stone building with a hipped iron roof.
  • The external walls are of high quality sparrow picked stone.
  • Shuttered french windows open onto a fine two storey cast iron decorated verandah.
  • The interior has a simple four-square plan with a central hallway. There are several fine marble fireplaces.
  • The internal staircase has been removed and replaced by an external stair.
  • At the rear there is a single storey addition in brick.
  • The building is in good condition and the garden has mature trees (National Trust).
Sacred Heart Presbytery

1188 Pacific Highway, Pymble

On June 9th, 1907, the Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church Presbytery foundation stone was laid by Cardinal Moran and the Presbytery opened later that year.

  • The architect of the Presbytery was Mr Herbert Wardell who was the son of the noted architect William Wilkinson Wardell, who designed both St Patrick’s Roman Catholic Cathedral in Melbourne and St Mary’s Cathedral Sydney.
  • The Presbytery is two-storey and has a sandstone brick and stucco exterior, slate hipped roof with gabled front and wooden shingle detailing, gothic style featured windows detailed by exposed brickwork, open tiled porch with timbered columns and sandstone foundations. Some additions have been done (National Trust).

external image The%252520Sacred%252520Heart%252520Presbytery%252520opened%252520in%2525201907.jpg

Item

1190 Pacific Highway, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920; Altered or extended sympathetically

1190 Pacific Highway, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
1190 Pacific Highway, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Colinroobie

1202 Pacific Highway, Pymble

  • See page Colinroobie, 1202 Pacific Highway, Pymble
    A two-storeyed Edwardian period residence of red-brick with tiled roof topped by a metal weathervane. The building is of Federation style showing typical architectural details such as circular arched windows and doors, elaborate coloured leadlight, decorative timberwork, ornate brick chimneys and projecting bay windows. The bay window roofs are slate, and this suggests that the main tile roofing is recent. The building is set well back from the street with large open front space and is framed by mature trees and shrubs (National Trust).

    Colinroobie, 1 Clydesdale Place Pymble NSW
    Colinroobie, 1 Clydesdale Place Pymble NSW
Mountview

1228 Pacific Highway, Pymble

Historical period: 1901-1920; Altered or extended unsympathetically

  • external image $_20.JPG

7. Station Street, Pymble

Maples, The

5 Station Street, Pymble

The Maples 5 Station Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
The Maples 5 Station Street, Pymble; by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Chescombe

11 Station Street, Pymble

Chescombe 11 Station Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Chescombe 11 Station Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Llanberri 13 Station Street, (11A Station Street)
Shadowood 17 Station Street, Pymble
Dwelling

19 Station Street, Pymble

19 Station Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
19 Station Street, Pymble by: Robert Moore, Penelope Pike, Helen Proudfoot
Uplands

21 Station Street, Pymble

21 Station Street Pymble NSW 2073
21 Station Street Pymble NSW 2073

History
Pymble is named after Robert Pymble (1776–1861), an influential early settler whose 1823 land grant comprised some 600 acres, around half the land of the region.

  • The other half (plus a large part of St Ives) was granted to Daniel der Matthew’s, another influential settler who established the first sawmill in the area.
  • The region was important to the early Sydney colony as a major supplier of timber for a wide variety of uses. The main timber varieties were blackbutt, stringybark, iron bark and blue gum.

This area lies within two early land grants,

  • Robert Pymble’s 600 acre grant (240ha) of 1823 and Rosedale,
  • DD Mathew’s 800 acre grant (320ha) of 1838.

These two grants extended from Lane Cove Road (now the Pacific Highway) northwards.

  • Pymble’s grant extends to what is now Allara Avenue, North Turramurra, and is bounded by Station Street and Merrivale Road to the east and the alignment of Fairlawn Avenue to the west.
  • Mathew’s grant extended to what is now Killeaton Street, St Ives, to the north and was bounded by Station Street and Merrivale Road to the west and Rosedale Road and Park Avenue, Gordon to the east.

The area was used for timber getting up until around 1840.

  • Mona Vale Road was originally divided into two parts which joined at Telegraph Road – the southern part was known as Stoney Creek Road, and the northern part was known as Pittwater Road. These roads were used as D.D. Mathew’s access to his sawmill on Cowan Road, St Ives.
  • Telegraph Road marks the main timber getting route through both land grants towards Stoney Creek Road and Pittwater Road.
  • Telegraph Road was originally known as Government Road, and was named to commemorate the construction of the telegraph line from Parramatta to the coast, which ran along a section of the road.

By the 1850s orchards were established in the area, and resulted in subdivision of the early land grants –

  • Robert Pymble’s two sons subdivided the area closest to Lane Cove Road after 1856.
  • Robert McIntosh, orchardist, obtained a holding west of Station Street and used land up to Telegraph Road.
  • An 1881 map shows William McKeown and James McMahon as the major landholders within the area, and shows allotments extending on both sides of Stoney Creek Road (Mona Vale Road).
  • Pre-1880 the area was claimed to have the best orchards in Ku-ring-gai.

Post-1890 Subdivisions leading up to 1890 anticipated the completion of the North Shore Railway line in 1890.

  • The first subdivision of McKeown’s lands, the Roseville Estate, created Roseville Avenue (now Wellesley Road), which extended north from Lane Cove Road to Church Street.
  • A second subdivision created residential lots through to Stoney Creek Road (Mona Vale Road) and from Church Street to a newly defined Hope Street.
  • A later re-offer redefined this subdivision as the Pymble Heights Estate in 1892 (see Figure 4 below). It included deep lots extending from Stoney Creek Road through to a laneway (later Orana Avenue).
  • A further re-subdivision of the estate before 1900 created Edward Street and Emily Street – streets which were later joined to become King Edward Street – as well as lots along Grandview Street and Mocatta Street.
  • An early subdivision to the east of McKeown’s land, known as the Hillside Subdivision, created large lots along Fern Street. A re-subdivision of these lots, as part of the Fern Estate, resulted in smaller lots being offered for sale in 1910.

Railway arrives

The single-track North Shore railway line that went from Hornsby to St Leonards in 1890 finally reached Milsons Point in 1893 where passenger and vehicular ferries completed the journey to the city.

  • Offering suburban subdivisions along the railway line in advance of the stations, speculators developed Ku-ring-gai well before completion of the North Shore Bridge in 1932 set off another flurry of real estate promotion.

Ku-ring-gai grew slowly in the nineteenth century, its population being 4,000 by 1901. However, over the next two decades its population quadrupled. By this time, with its large residences in beautiful, leafy surrounds, it had changed from a district with a dubious reputation to one that attracted people of high socio-economic status, 73 per cent of whom were home owners.

  • During the interwar years of 1921 to 1933, the population increased by 45 per cent from 19,209 to 27,931 with a 68 per cent rise in the number of occupied dwellings, the proportion of brick to weatherboard being 5:1.

Topography

The conservation area generally slopes down from Telegraph Road to the southeast and has many steeply sloping streets. The area is intersected by a creek line, which runs along the eastern side of Orana Avenue, across Church Street, Wellesley Road and Fern Street and eventually crosses under Mona Vale Road. Robert Pymble Park is located at a low point of the topography, outside the study area.

  • Significant remnant Blue Gum High Forest area is retained along the creek line.
  • North-south streets such as Alma Avenue and Station Street are particularly steep, with east-west streets such as Telegraph Road, Hope Street, and Church Street being less steep.
  • Except in Bannockburn Road, Bungalow Avenue and Reservoir Road, most lots are large and some lots are very large.

Sefton Hall, Mount Wilson

Sefton Hall, Mount Wilson NSW

Sefton Hall, 17-19 Church Lane, Mount Wilson, NSW 2786

The only non-Victorian style stately house of the eight surviving ‘foundation’ houses of the Mount Wilson Conservation area: Wynstay, Dennarque andYengo, Bebeah, Withycombe, Nooroo and Sefton.

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SEFTON HALL, MOUNT WILSON NSW;Photographer: Ross Heathcote Date Photographed: October 1994
SEFTON HALL, MOUNT WILSON NSW;Photographer: Ross Heathcote Date Photographed: October 1994
Henry Marcus Clark (1859-1913)
Henry Marcus Clark (1859-1913)

Henry Marcus Clark, the well-known Sydney Retailer, purchased a number of portions of land in Mt. Wilson c.1910-1912 including Beowang. However for his residence he built Sefton Hall (Figure 7) where Balangra (the home of James Dalrymple Cox, the brother of George Henry Cox) had stood,

  • the original Beowang building having been moved in two parts one of which became a Billiard Room and the other was later called Sefton Cottage.
  • Significantly, Henry Marcus Clark pioneered the introduction of the telephone to Mt. Wilson by having a line laid from Mt. Victoria to Sefton Hall c.1912
Sefton Hall, Mount Wilson, c 1912
Sefton Hall, Mount Wilson, c 1912

Sefton Hall was completed around 1912 as a summer retreat for wealthy Sydney retailer Henry Marcus Clark (1859-1913). Clark had made his fortune from the Marcus Clark & Co. chain of department stores which he had established in 1883. When he bought the Mount Wilson property, then known as Balangra, from pastoralist James Dalrymple Cox in 1909 it included a late nineteenth-century timber cottage with lattice-enclosed verandahs. The cottage now stands within the grounds of Sefton Hall and is known as the ‘billiard room’.

Clark called his new house ‘Sefton Hall’ after the village of Sefton in Lancashire, England where he had grown up. An earlier home in the Sydney suburb of Dulwich Hill had also been named ‘Sefton Hall’.

  • Mt. Wilga House was also reputedly designed by the owner Marcus Clark and planned along similar lines to his summer home ‘Sefton Hall’ at Mount Wilson in the Northern Blue Mountains. Mt. Wilga House was intended to be Marcus Clark’s winter home.
View over gardens to bungalow in the distance, Mount Wilson, ca. 1970 / Wes Stacey
View over gardens to bungalow in the distance, Mount Wilson, ca. 1970 / Wes Stacey
SEFTON HALL, MOUNT WILSON by Phil Woodman
SEFTON HALL, MOUNT WILSON by Phil Woodman
Bungalow viewed from side lane, Mount Wilson, ca. 1970 / Wes Stacey, 1941
Bungalow viewed from side lane, Mount Wilson, ca. 1970 / Wes Stacey, 1941
Church Lane outside Sefton Hall - David Lori
Church Lane outside Sefton Hall – David Lori

The Mount Wilson property sprawls across 20 rooms and is clad in fibro with pressed metal ceilings, though the original corrugated iron roof has been replaced by slate. The original materials were chosen for both their portability and fire resistant qualities.[1]

Photographs from Sydney Living Museums

external image Sefton%252520Hall%2525203.jpg external image Sefton%252520Hall%2525202.jpg
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Although Clark died not long after Sefton Hall was built the property remained in family hands until 1994. The house and grounds were photographed prior to the first ever public sale of the house.

Historic Significance

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Sefton Hall, its billiard room and garden display both characteristics of the early development of Mount Wilson before 1890 and the sort of twentieth-century development which another generation of the wealthy could bring to the hill-station.

  • The property combines a garden which, like Nooroo, retains some of the major trees which were planted in the 1880s and something of the original garden concept, particularly in relation to the The Avenue.
  • The property includes a cottage (later a billiard room to Sefton Hall) and Balangra (now Sefton Cottage), built by George Cox’s brother James.
  • The survival of part of Belangra as Sefton Hall’s billiard room and because of the tree plantings, still has a palpable presence in Mount Wilson.
  • Henry Marcus Clark, the founder of one of Sydney’s most successful businesses in 1902, was a vigorous and imaginative man who brought a vitality to Mount Wilson that was not without controversy but did not lack signficane at a State level.
  • The Anglican church, a particularly successful design in asbestos cement, was built by the Clark family in 1916 on land given by Clark before his death as a memorial to him after his death.

Aesthetic Significance

Part of old Belangra, now a billiard room in the garden.
Part of old Belangra, now a billiard room in the garden.

Sefton Hall is of high significance for its selection of materials, particularly the extravagant use of fibrous cement sheeting on a residence of substantial scale and conscious design.

  • The design of the residence is a commendable example of the inter-war (Federation Queen Anne) bungalow style featuring multiple gables embellished with asymmetrical screens, generous verandahs, bay windows and beveled glass.
  • The separate billiard-room, described as ‘quaint’ by Howard Tanner (Great Gardens, 94) is exceptionally fetching in the front garden. The whole aspect of the property is a heritage asset of State significance.
  • Belangra was built in 1880 as a larger holiday residence for J.D. Cox. Note the added gables and trimmings in the Queen Anne idiom to the billiard room; the other part of Belangra is now Sefton Cottage..

Images from the Blue Mountains Library

1. “Wynstay,” Mount Wilson

"Wynstay," Mount Wilson
“Wynstay,” Mount Wilson
2. Beowang, Mount Wilson

Beowang, Mount Wilson
Beowang, Mount Wilson
3. Mount Wilson

Mount Wilson
Mount Wilson
4. Dennarque, View from the east, Mount Wilson

Dennarque, View from the east, Mount Wilson
Dennarque, View from the east, Mount Wilson
5. Cox Family, The Avenue

Cox Family, The Avenue
Cox Family, The Avenue
6. Bebeah, Mount Wilson

Bebeah, Mount Wilson
Bebeah, Mount Wilson
7. Bebeah, Mount Wilson

Bebeah, Mount Wilson
Bebeah, Mount Wilson
8. George Henry Cox (1824-1901)

George Henry Cox (1824-1901)
George Henry Cox (1824-1901)

The death of Marcus Clark

From about 1910, Henry Clark who had some recurring health problems began to think about retiring.

  • He put effort into the development of the property at Mt. Wilson. Clark named his new country seat “Sefton Hall” after his former home at Dulwich Hill.
  • In 1913, he became seriously ill and specialist physicians were sent up to Mt. Wilson from Sydney to advise on his condition. A decision was made to operate immediately – using the dining room table as an operating platform.
  • Clark, did not however, survive the operation. The cause of death was given as pancreatitis and cholelithasis. He was aged only 53.

The funeral was held at Enmore.

  • The Sydney Daily Telegraph (March 31, 1913) reported an attendance of about 1200 people, “including the deceased’s relatives and 400 employees” at the funeral service. As implied earlier, there was a not inconsiderable overlap between Clark’s relatives, friends, church associates and employees.
  • The service was conducted by A.E. Illingworth, Enmore minister, and G.T. Walden. Walden, whose grand portrait stares out of the pages of the Jubilee History had been the dynamic minister at Enmore during its glory years around 1900-1906. In his association with the Clarks, Walden seemed to acquire the role of family chaplain.
  • He officiated at family related weddings and funerals long after his time as minister at Enmore. Walden’s comments at the funeral include mention of a letter received from Henry just a few days before his death inviting him to visit.
Marcus Clark building onRailway Square
Marcus Clark building onRailway Square
Marcus Clark "Flatiron" store on Railway Square
Marcus Clark “Flatiron” store on Railway Square
Newtown Store, 1912
Newtown Store, 1912
  • Walden’s eloquent eulogy described Henry Clark as a “benefactor to hundreds, and a friend to all” (The Australian Christian of April 17, 1913). Walden went on to say “His shareholders and employees were to him members of a great family. When he died they knew they had lost a real friend as well as a successful general”. Walden supported that statement by reading numerous extracts from letters of bereavement sent by grieving employees. The high level of attendance by company employees at the funeral service (possibly around 50%) bears testimony to the regard with which they held him.external image Marcus%252520Clark.jpg
  • Concerning Clark’s generosity, Walden said: He gave prodigally to needy ones. One of Sydney’s leading doctors wrote ‘I have come across innumerable instances of his quiet generosity and goodness to others’. He gave liberally to organised charities but the greater part of his giving was direct to the needy ones, mostly anonymously, as he disliked being thanked for anything he did.

Walden concluded: Mr. Clark was a deeply religious man; though he seldom spoke his thoughts, he loved and worshipped God…….All of Mr. Clark’s children, except the youngest boy are members of the Church of Christ, Enmore….He was an entirely honest merchant and his memory is to all who keep it, dear and helpful. His sons and daughters whom he loved to the uttermost say this of him.

  • At the time of Henry’s death, Marcus Clarks had expanded into a chain of about 15 stores with 700 employees. It was one of the first of the department stores to realise the benefits of regionalisation. A year or two later, now an official army Chaplain, Walden departed for the Great War.11 The world was about to change – and so was retailing.
  • Henry Clark was succeeded by his eldest son Reginald Marcus who learned the trade while managing the Newtown store. Reginald got off to a bad start. While attending his father’s funeral, his home in Stanmore was ransacked by thieves. Under his leadership the chain store reached its apogee. In 1926 – 1928 a new store was erected in Railway Square facing Central Railway – apparently to replace the Flatiron building nearby.

Mount Wilson

Mount Wilson has high state significance because of its unusual development as an Indian-type hill-station for a handful of wealthy businessmen, lawyers and politicians escaping in summer from the climate of Sydney and Newcastle.

BISLEY GARDENS,  MOUNT WILSON,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
BISLEY GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
  • It preserves to an extraordinary extent the values which these nineteenth-century owners and their resident staff imposed on the striking environment of the basalt outcrop, with its tree-ferns and rain-forest.
  • The temptation to create exotic gardens in this lush place was indulged enthusiastically, so that the contrast and the tension between the native and the introduced, the natural and the modified, has created over a century a village of exceptional interest.
  • The surviving houses are collectively and individually fine examples of Victorian residential work with Yengo and Dennarque of particular merit. Wynstay, despite the loss of Yarrawa, is the jewel in the crown thanks to the fine suite of outbuildings including the gatehouse, stables and the unique Turkish bathhouse to complement Old Wynstay and the grander inter-war main house of Wynstay.
  • Later retreats such as Sefton Hall reinforce the qualities of these early retreats.

MT WILSON by Phil Woodman

Bisley Gardens Bench - Mt Wilson NSW Australia by Phil Woodman
Bisley Gardens Bench – Mt Wilson NSW Australia by Phil Woodman
Bisley Gardens - Mt Wilson NSW Australia by Phil Woodman
Bisley Gardens – Mt Wilson NSW Australia by Phil Woodman
MOUNT WILSON BISLEY GARDEN by Phil Woodman
MOUNT WILSON BISLEY GARDEN by Phil Woodman
Mt Wilson Laneway by Phil Woodman
Mt Wilson Laneway by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH GARDEN,  MOUNT WILSON,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH GARDEN, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
MOUNT WILSON PHOTOGRAPHS by Phil Woodman
MOUNT WILSON PHOTOGRAPHS by Phil Woodman
WOLLANGAMBE GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
WOLLANGAMBE GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
Mt. Wilson Copse Garden. by Phil Woodman
Mt. Wilson Copse Garden. by Phil Woodman
Mt. WILSON RESERVE,  BLUE  MOUNTAINS,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
Mt. WILSON RESERVE, BLUE MOUNTAINS, NSW. by Phil Woodman
SUNRISE MT. WILSON. BLUE MOUNTAINS, NSW. by Phil Woodman
SUNRISE MT. WILSON. BLUE MOUNTAINS, NSW. by Phil Woodman
MOUNT  WILSON,  BLUE  MOUNTAINS,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
MOUNT WILSON, BLUE MOUNTAINS, NSW. by Phil Woodman
COPSE PROPERTY,  MOUNT WILSON,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
COPSE PROPERTY, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH  GARDENS,  MOUNT  WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH  GARDENS,  MOUNT  WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
BEBEAH GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
QUEENS  AVENUE,  MOUNT  WILSON,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
QUEENS AVENUE, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman
BISLEY GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON,  NSW. by Phil Woodman
BISLEY GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman

Mount Wilson has been a popular weekend destination for more than a century.

  • A little corner of rural England in the middle of an ancient rainforest with special homes including
    Farcry, Sefton Hall, Donna Buang, Sefton Cottage, Dennarque, Campanella, Woodstock, Lindfield Park, Merrygarth, Yengo, Eastcote, Shasta Lodge, and Wynstay.

Is it the lichen on the beautiful old outdoor setting, the tunnel vision of colourful trees on the main avenue, the statues, the clean mountain air, the ornate gates, the ornamental features on the old houses or the glorious green lawns?

  • Whatever it is, there is no doubting that Mt Wilson is a special spot.
  • The locals will tell you that once they get to the hairpin bend on Mt Wilson Rd and drive into the dark forest created by tall trees blocking the sunlight, they know they are home.

Mt Wilson is 9km off the Bells Line Of Road in the Blue Mountains. Allow for a good 90-minute drive from Sydney; along the way you can pick up fresh apples from the roadside stalls at Bilpin and stop off at the Mt Tomah Botanic Garden.

  • The area is drenched by rain during the summer, creating lush growth that bodes well for an abundant autumn display on Mt Wilson’s open garden weekend in Autumn and Spring every year.
  • The large, ancient trees enable plenty of space for shade.
  • Birdlife is abundant here too, including small birds such as blue wrens.
  • “When you are weeding here they come and sit near you. The little birds here are tame. They feel safe, they nest on the ground,” Wai says.
sefton cottage house
sefton cottage house
sefton cottage pagoda
sefton cottage pagoda

The department store owner in Marrickville Road
Fronting Marrickville Road at Dulwich Hill, Henry Marcus Clark (1859–1913) had the original property, Sefton Hall, named after the village of Sefton in Lancashire, England where he had grown up.

  • Before moving to Sefton Hall in 1890, the family had lived at Newtown.
  • They would later have other country residences at Mount Wilga, Hornsby, and another Sefton Hall at Mount Wilson in the Blue Mountains.

Sefton Hall Marrickville had a high brick fence concealing it from view. The Clark children loved to hide behind the fence at dusk and, as people were walking home from work, they would throw a penny tied to a piece of cotton and pull it back quickly. The children would laugh at the sight of someone madly chasing the penny up Marrickville Road.

  • The property was associated with lavish entertainments and fund raising benefits for the local Marrickville Cottage Hospital. For special occasions Marcus Clark always lit the grounds with Chinese lanterns and fairy lamps.
  • Sefton Hall was the first private house in Sydney to have a swimming pool
  • In the early twentieth century, Sefton Hall was demolished and the land was subdivided. From this subdivision, several blocks of shops were built along Marrickville Road. The shopkeeper in Marcus Clark would have approved as it did give a boost to the retail life of Dulwich Hill.

Further reading:

Marcia A.M. Clark, The story of Henry Marcus Clark and Sefton Hall, Personal publishing Pty Ltd, Sydney, 1985
Chapter on Sefton Hall in Alison Halliday & Joanne Hambrett, A passion for place: gardens of the Blue Mountains, Melbourne, Bloomings Books, Melbourne, 2011


  1. ^

    Caroline Simpson Library & Research Collection, Photograph Ross Heathcote, (c) Sydney Living Museums –
    http://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/documenting-nsw-homes/sefton-hall

Leura, Bellevue Hill

Leura c1891 – One of Sydney’s grandest estates

Leura, 24 Victoria Road, BELLEVUE HILL NSW 2023

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LEURA – 24 Victoria Rd, Bellevue Hill. Built in 1891 for Mr Tom Knox, brother of Edward William Knox, adjoining ‘Rona’ and probably by the same architect.

  • Of Federation Queen Anne style, the house was gutted by fire in January, 1909 and the wooden shingle roof replaced by terracotta shingles.
  • In 1956, the house was purchased by Cranbrook School serving as ‘Street House’ for boarders named after the then President of the School Council, Sir Kenneth Street
  • Leura has since returned to the private sector. The site was once an Aboriginal camp alongside a natural spring.[1]
  • Sales listing

Leura, the trophy home Bellevue Hill spring 2015 offering

Businessman Ken Allen and wife Christina have listed one of Sydney’s finest estates, the 1891 Bellevue Hill mansion, Leura.

  • It comes with initially cautious $30 million plus advisory.
  • Some 29 years since last sold, the tightly held home has just had the six owners through its 125 years.
  • Its listing is perfectly timed as leading eastern suburbs agents are complaining there’s simply not enough prestige property to satisfy the latent spring market demand.

Set on 4,260 square metres Leura is a trophy home “unparalleled in grace, style and historic significance”.

Situated on a 4260 square metres Leura has a lot to offer. Photo supplied
Situated on a 4260 square metres Leura has a lot to offer. Photo supplied
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Even in Sydney $30 million seems a lot for a property but just the views at Leura are worth at least that!
The view from 'Leura' located in Bellevue Hill.
The view from ‘Leura’ located in Bellevue Hill.

It was built on the Bellevue Hill ridge line for the Knox family, of the then burgeoning Colonial Sugar Refinery empire.

  • The middle aged Tom Knox had Leura, and his older brother, Edward had nearby Rona, probably both designed by the same architect, Walter Vernon Liberty.
  • Tom Knox, who had married into the Victorian pastoralist Ritchie family, was the managing director of Dalegty, the stock and station agency.
  • Those pioneering Knox brothers chose the hillside panorama long before Sydney Harbour’s famous icons, partly because of the unsanitary conditions down on the water’s edge.
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“It is a monument to the Federation Queen Anne style of architecture from the era,” Ray White Double Bay listing agent Michael Finger says.
August 11, 2015 5:26pmThe Sunday Telegraph

With eight bedrooms and plenty of space there is all the room a growing family could need.
With eight bedrooms and plenty of space there is all the room a growing family could need.

Finger’s Ray White colleague Di Wilson says the property was purchased in the mid-1950s by Cranbrook School for boarders.

  • With privacy at the very end of a circular driveway off Victoria Road, the eight bedroom home combines traditional opulence and modern design. There’s a tennis court and resort swimming pool…and private level lawns overlooked by wide north facing verandahs.
  • It last traded through Michael Finger in 1986 for a then very impressive $7.3 million when sold by the top end home restorer Bill Shipton, who’d engaged building designer, Roderick Learoyd, trained at the Oxford School of Architecture, to assist in its renaissance.
  • The 1986 sale to the New Zealand businessman heralded the brief mid-1980s trend of Kiwi entrepreneurs crossing the Tasman to try their luck in Sydney, all with trophy home acquisition to boot. They included the Goodman Fielder Wattie chairman, Pat Goodman who secured another Shipton home, the 1917 Double Bay mansion, Verona.
  • Most departed after the 1987 stockmarket crash, with Sydney not ever seeing the likes of Sir Frank Renouf, John Spencer, Rod Petricevic and Colin Reynolds again.

Leura

Other name/s: Street House (Cranbrook School)

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  • Heritage Registered in NSW
  • Over 4260 square meters of established grounds, resort style sanctuary (Ray White Double Bay, 2015).
  • Retains its splendid setting and panoramic views of Sydney harbour; the curved drive passes below in front of the house (Boyd, unpub., 2010, 226).
  • Site of an old Aboriginal camp and has a natural spring (NTA, 1978).

A Substantial Marine Villa but in 1890, probably the last collaboration between (Walter Liberty) Vernon and (Howard) Joseland. Two storey brick house retains its splendid setting and panoramic views of Sydney harbour.

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  • The characteristic Shavian planning is evident in the arrangement of the principal rooms, which overlook the harbour, around the substantial stair hall.
  • The small gable that marks the entrance and the main stair hall are Gothic Revival in character, employing restrained Gothic style tracery to the large window that lights the stairhall and to the front door.
  • The stairhall has been altered; the ceiling and the upper rooms were unfortunately destroyed in a fire in 1909. A new roofline, with an additional gable was built.
  • The generous two-storey vernadah employs cast iron columns, providing the necessary strength for the added height (Boyd, unpub., 2010, 226-9).
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Prestige Family Estate, Unrivalled And Unforgettable

Undeniably one of Sydney’s grandest estates, Leura c1891 is a landmark residence unparalleled in grace, style and historic significance. The majestic home is embraced by 4,260sqm of established grounds and is a monument to the Federation Queen Anne style of architecture from the era.
Set against a breathtaking panorama over Sydney Harbour’s famous icons, the home has been intuitively crafted to create a resort-style sanctuary with a magical sense of privacy and seclusion at the very end of an exclusive circular driveway.

  • 8 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms, 6 car garage
  • Grand interiors with elegant details
  • Tennis court and resort swimming pool
  • Private level lawns and wide verandahs
  • Gracious formal and informal areas
  • Original ballroom with soaring ceilings
  • North facing with superb harbour views[2]

History

Bellevue Hill:

The name given to the suburb was taken from that given to the look-out area which later became Bellevue Park – named ‘Belle Vue’ by Governor Macquarie as an alternative to the colloquial ‘Vinegar Hill’ which Macquarie considered vulgar (Woollahra Council, local history fast-facts, Bellevue Hill, accessed 7/8/2015).

  • The area was accessed by the Old South Head Road from 1811 and the New South Head Road from the 1830s. Victoria Road was formed by the Surveyor General, Sir Thomas Mitchell’s survey of 1844 (Broomham, Bellevue Hill thematic history, in Woollahra Library, 2015, 1).

Point Piper Estate:

  • The subject properties were originally part of the extensive Point Piper Estate, land accumulated by Captain John Pipe since 1816, later conveyed to the emancipist traders Cooper and Levey in 1826 following Piper experiencing financial difficulties. The estate, by then comprising 1130 acres, became the property exclusively of Daniel Cooper in 1847. After 1850 Cooper began offering some sections of his estate for sale and others as 99 year leases (ibid, 2015, 1).
  • Edwin Tooth took up a lease of over 40 acres in Bellevue Hill in December 1854 (Broomham, R., ‘Coopers of Woollahra’, 2000, 14). Following Edwin’s death, his brother Robert Tooth built the mansion Cranbrook on the southern side of New South Head Road in 1859-60. Cranbrook was eventually sold to the founders of Cranbrook School in 1917 (ibid, 2015, 1).
  • In c1880 Edward Knox and his brother-in-law William GIlchrist sub-leased an area of Edwin’s land in Bellevue Hill, and by the turn of the century had purchased the freehold from the Cooper family. Edward built the house ‘Rona’ on his part of the land in 1883. Edward Knox and William Gilchrist made available a portion of land adjacent to Rona for Edward’s brtoehr Thomas Forster Knox (ibid, 2015, 1).
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Leura’s Garden:

Over 4260 square meters of established grounds, resort style sanctuary (Ray White Double Bay, 2015).

  • Retains its splendid setting and panoramic views of Sydney harbour; the curved drive passes below in front of the house (Boyd, unpub., 2010, 226).
  • Site of an old Aboriginal camp and has a natural spring (NTA, 1978).
  • Trees include a Hill’s fig on the house’s western side (Ficus microcarpa ‘Hillii’)(Stuart Read, pers.comm., 19/8/2015).
  • Commanding position to harbour – important in visual catchment from New South Head Road as evidenced by photograph E33 (Hughes Trueman et al, 1984).
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Mansion:

Federation Queen Anne style mansion (1891) adjoining ‘Rona’ and probably by the same architect (WMC, 2015).

  • Early Queen Anne style, leading to Federation style.
  • Leadlight doors and window at rear.
  • Timber panelling. Grand stair.
  • Prominent siting to Sydney Harbour. Site of an old Aboriginal camp and has a natural spring.
  • Knox family connection.

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A number of the original decorative details survive, such as the wave motif to the dado rail, the blue and white transfer tiles and the fern and sunburst detail to the grate in the dining room.

  • The decorative motifs used are similar to the interior schemes designed by French-Australian artist Lucien Henry. Details such as panelled timber ceilings and soffits and the incised Japanese-style curves in the solid brackets to the first floro are details that appear in Vernon’s later domestic designs, the former in his own house at Wendover and in the postal chamber of the Newtown Post Office and the latter in the staff residence in the grounds of Callan Park.
  • Further evidence that the house is largely Vernon’s work is a surviving (unpublished) tender analysis held by Woollahra Council. Completed by ‘Mr. Vernon’, the list included prices from two of the builders engaged to build a number of the residences in the Neutral Bay Estate.
  • It is likely that detailed supervision of the construction of Leura was undertaken by Joseland; the houe was not completed until 1891, by which time Vernon had been appointed Government Architect.
  • Of Vernon’s surviving work prior to this appointment, it is this design that marks the watershed between the London-influenced Queen Anne Revival and Shavian English Domestic Revival and the more restrained local variant of the style: the Federation style.
  • It was the domestic-scale public buildings designed by Vernon and the Government Architect’s Branch in the 1890s that helped to spread the Federation style across the state, however he had already been using a similar architectural vocabulary before his appointment to the position (ibid, 2010, 229).
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Physical condition and/or Archaeological potential: Very good (17/5/1984: Tanner & Associates; Jack & Ashton, 1984). Date condition updated: 27 Aug 15

Modifications and dates:

  • 1909: gutted by fire in January that year, the wooden shingle roof was replaced by terracotta shingles.
    • The billiard room on the house’s south-west is a later addition (ibid, 228).
  • 1956 purchased by Cranbrook School to serve as ‘Street House’ for boarders.
  • 1956 Fowell, Mansfield & Macluran (for Cranbrook School) alterations and additions (approved 17.12.1956)
  • 1959 Fowell, Mansfield & Macluran (for Cranbrook School) toilet added (approved 12.1.1959)
  • 1965 Denis Rourke architect/builder (for Cranbrook School) – fire stair added (approved 23.12.1965).
  • c.1985 R.Learoyd architect/builder (for B.Levy) – alterations and additions (approval date not recorded);
  • CPA consultants (for B.Levy) (pool and tennis court (approved 8.4.1986).
  • c.1985 W.J.Shipton – mechanical vent, heating (approved 25.5.1986).
  • c1987 Rodera P/L (for K. Allen) alterations and additions (approved 30.6.1989)
  • c.1990 K.Allen – fencing (approved 11.4.1991)(ibid, 2015, 5).

It has since returned to the private sector (WMC, 2015).


  1. ^ http://www.woollahra.nsw.gov.au/library/local_history/local_history_fast_facts/l
  2. ^ http://www.domain.com.au/for-sale/24-victoria-road-bellevue-hill-nsw-2023-2012176280

Federation Bay Windows

Federation Bay Windows

[previous page: 2-Storey Federation next page: Federation Floor and Path Tiling]

Cosiness with Light:


Bay Windows

  • Bay windows became a hugely popular feature of Queen Anne residential architecture in theBritish Isles from about the 1870s and hold a continuous appeal up to this day.
Bay window with arch but no window seat
Bay window with arch but no window seat
  • Bay windows are used to increase the flow of natural light into a building, thereby also making a room appear larger, and to provide views of the outside which would be unavailable with an ordinary flat window.[5]
A beautiful, complex bay window at 6 Buena Vista Avenue  Clifton Gardens, has become a conversation nook
A beautiful, complex bay window at 6 Buena Vista Avenue Clifton Gardens, has become a conversation nook
The bay window as a nook for taking tea, at 6 Buena Vista Avenue  Clifton Gardens
The bay window as a nook for taking tea, at 6 Buena Vista Avenue Clifton Gardens

Bay windows were a popular feature in many period and Federation-style homes.Bay windows project out from the wall and extend to the ground.

What is a bay window?

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A bay window is a series of windows assembled in a polygon shape that project outward from the face of a house.- Source: Aust Window Association FAQs

Generally composed of three individual windows with the side units at 45 degree or 30 degree angles to the wall. –Source – Stegbar
An “angle bay window” refers to the angle of departure from the plane of the wall. Source: Language of Windows

A bay window is a window space projecting outward from the main walls of a building and forming a bay in a room, either square or polygonal in plan. The angles most commonly used on the inside corners of the bay are 90, 135 and 150 degrees. Wikipedia

A bow window is a curved bay window. Bow windows are designed to create space by projecting beyond the exterior wall of a building, and to provide a wider view of the garden or street outside and typically combine four or more casement windows, which join together to form an arch.


Bay Windows from Freepedia

ArtsAndCraftsHome-Bays.jpg
Oriel window above, and bay window below at Devon, Martin Road, Centennial Park

In 1894 the UK Building Act changed the regulations, so that windows no longer had to be flush with the exterior wall. This enabled windows to stand proud from the facade.

The late Victorian and Edwardian period took advantage of the change in new building regulations and now presented their windows in bays. Medium and larger houses would often display double bay or bow windows.

A bay window creates the illusion of a larger room. It also maximizes the amount of light entering a room and offers a dryer alternative to a balcony.

A bay window extrudes from a main exterior wall, forming a space framed by three or more windows. The space may be square, polygonal, or round depending on the type of structure. Traditional bay windows are built with inside angles of 90, 135 and 150 degrees, although there are many custom variations.

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History of Bay Windows

from: ehow.co.uk

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Unusual double bay-windows in Haberfield

Bay windows can be found in architecture dating back to the early English Renaissance, where the idea is thought to have come from large bay rooms placed at the ends of great halls in mansions and castles.
Unusual double bay-windows in Haberfield

A surge in popularity is most notable during the late Victorian and Edwardian periods. In England, bay windows came back into style after the London Building Act of 1894 allowed a change in building regulations requiring windows to be flush with exterior walls. At the same time, bay windows began showing up in America, and became rampant in the West during the California Gold Rush.

Box Bay Window

A box bay uses a 90-degree angle to form a protruding box shape. Traditional box styles have a large bay or double-paned window flanked by a smaller window on each side. A sitting area or shelves may be added to the interior. Box bay structures are often found in kitchens as garden windows.

bay window
bay window
Curved bay window
Curved bay window
Box window
Box window

Bow Window

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Randwick Oriel bay window
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8 Crescent Street Haberfield

A bow window is a softer variation of the normally angular bay window. Four or more paned segments follow a rounded semicircle pattern.

These types of windows showed up during the Georgian period and became fashionable in Regency-style architecture. Bow windows were popular additions to English country homes because it made a person feel outdoors while in the comfort of the home.

Circle Bay Window

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A circle bay structure is a more extreme version of the bow window, joining a combination of windows together into a smooth circular area. They are often wrapped around building corners.

Circle bay windows came into vogue during the Gothic era and are popular in master bedroom suites, living rooms, and dining nooks.

Oriel Window

Oriel windows are rounded window structures built on the upper levels of a building. They are usually supported by brackets or corbels and do not reach ground level.

They originated with the idea of creating an upper-level porch area. Oriel windows became popular during the Gothic Revival and are often found in Arabian architecture, where they are called mashrabiyas.

external image windowsOriel1.jpg external image windowsOriel3.jpg external image windowsOriel2.jpg external image windowsOriel4.jpg

Web-Randwick-eve038.jpg
Haberfield Arts and Craft projecting Window
Randwick-Cowper040B.JPG
Randwick Bay Window
Addenbrooke Interior showing large bay window and windows seating
Addenbrooke Interior showing large bay window and windows seating
Window seat in bay window at 16 Bradleys Head Road Mosman
Window seat in bay window at 16 Bradleys Head Road Mosman
Addenbrooke window seat in a large bay window, obscured by the breakfast table setting
Addenbrooke window seat in a large bay window, obscured by the breakfast table setting

Window seats

A window seat is a miniature sofa without a back, intended to fill the recess of a window.

  • In the latter part of the 18th century, when tall narrow sash windows were almost universal, the window seat was in high favor.
  • A window seat is a seating area in an alcove or nook that is lined with windows.
  • These seating areas have romantic associations, as many people idealize the sense of luxury and spare time that they suggest.
  • Typically, the seat is installed in an area with an attractive view, so that someone seated in it can enjoy the beauty of the outdoors while working on a project that requires natural light, such as knitting.
  • Such seats are also used for reading or simply enjoying a respite from daily life.[6]
  • A bay window is a natural spot for a window seat.
12 Coogee Bay Road Randwick NSW
12 Coogee Bay Road Randwick NSW
Addenbrooke Interior showing a window seat in a bay window
Addenbrooke Interior showing a window seat in a bay window
Window seat with corner fireplace at 18 Prince Albert Street Mosman
Window seat with corner fireplace at 18 Prince Albert Street Mosman

Classic Federation Features

Quintessential Australian Federation Features

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‘Wedderburn’ 15 Throssell StreetHyde Park Perth ‘Talla Walla’ 2 Main StreetUlverstone TAS 7315

View the defining elements of Federation Style

‘Wedderburn’ 15 Throssell Street, Hyde Park, Perth W.A. 6000

“Beyond the Grandeur is a superbly elegant and comfortable home with all the amenities of the large suburban home within the City Walls

'Wedderburn' 15 Throssell Street Hyde Park, Perth, WA 6000
‘Wedderburn’ 15 Throssell Street Hyde Park, Perth, WA 6000

The development of Hyde Park took place during the period 1891-1899 and included two lakes with bird sanctuary islands in the middle.
This attracted some of the wealthier members of the community to its surrounds. Amongst them was George Throssell (later elected as the State’s Premier), who built a substantial home in 1901 overlooking the park.[1]

Throssel House, 15 Throssell Street Hyde Park, Perth

  • asking $2,000,000 – $2,250,000
  • Originally named ‘Wedderburn’, the house was designed by architect George W McMullen and built in 1901 by Richard Sparrow, a Perth

attorney. He resided there until his death in 1941. The house has since had various owners making changes and additions.[2]

Impressive Architecture

  • Exquisite Beauty
  • Historic Significance
  • Superb Craftsmanship and
  • Extraordinary Attention to Detail

1. Wide Verandah

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2. Dazzling lead lights

The wide Veranda leading to an Entry Foyer with dazzling lead lights and hinting at the grandeur to come.

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3. Bay Window

4. Carved Fireplace

  • Elegant Formal Living complete with Bay Window, double hung Lead Light Windows that glow in the northern sunlight,
  • Intricate Carved Fireplace and Over Mantel (note full-size wine cellar below).

5. Wooden Floor boards

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6. High Ceilings

  • The Dining Room adjoined by ornate double arched alcoves, enjoys the same stunning lead lights and Fireplace.
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7. Ornate Ceiling Rose

  • The elegantly long hallway gives access and flexibility of use to all main rooms.

8. Elaborate Cornices

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  • The three ground floor bedrooms, two with fireplaces and original built-in robes, another with en-suite, all enjoy the same level of architectural excellence and detail.
  • A large period family bathroom is also on the ground floor.
  • The perfect Home Office with splendid lead light window and separate entrance includes an ornate fireplace.
Floorplan
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Virtual Tour

The whole first floor comprises the Master Suite with walk in robe and en-suite, allows access to the Rooftop Belvedere with stunning 360° views of the Hyde Park Perth City and Darling Range.

external image image15%252520%252527Wedderburn%252527%25252015%252520Throssell%252520Street%252520Hyde%252520Park%252520Perth%252520WA.jpg external image image14%252520%252527Wedderburn%252527%25252015%252520Throssell%252520Street%252520Hyde%252520Park%252520Perth%252520WA.jpg
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  • Enjoy wonderful amenities of the idyllic Hyde Park.
  • With the restaurants of Beaufort Street just a stroll through the park.”

‘Talla Walla’ 2 Main Street Ulverstone TAS. 7315

Classic Federation Family Home

Every now and then a ‘one of a kind’ iconic home comes to market in most towns and on this occasion, in the Northern Tasmanian, Central Coast Township of Ulverstone, one of its most prominent and superbly built and located Federation homes, is now offered for sale.

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  • Built around 1910, ‘Talla Walla’ (Aboriginal name for ‘Forest View’) is a classic example of Queen Anne Federation architecture and is set on a stunning 1,644m2 allotment directly across the road from the shores of the Leven River and just a short walk to the extensive coastal fringing parklands that are such a wonderful enhancement to the lifestyle amenities of Ulverstone, the largest Township in Tasmania.
  • This charming, fully and faithfully restored home, originally built for one of the most prominent business families in Ulverstone, is a total joy to walk through with its 12 foot ceilings, polished floor boards, genuine Axminster carpets, working open fireplaces and that undeniable and unmistakeable atmosphere of elegance, charm and quality with a tangible presence of yesteryear in every glance.

1. Wide Verandah

  • Wrapping around the north-west corner of the home, a spacious wide verandah offers a wonderful place to sit and take advantage of the stunning views looking out over the river and wharfs and afar, to the once heavily forested rural landscape that inspired the property name .
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2. Leadlight glass

  • Superb formal dining and lounge rooms,
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  • a parlour that is equally useful as a spacious bedroom

3. Ornate working Fireplaces

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4. High Ceilings

5. Picture Rails

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6. Restored Bathrooms

7. Floorboards

  • The main bathroom not only has a roomy separate shower but a claw-foot bath,
  • pressed tin panelled walls and quality taps & fittings out of classically traditional exposed plumbing.
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  • New and wonderfully appointed kitchen that blends both modern and traditional cooking facilities, this 4 or 3 bedroom home has everything a classic home enthusiast could wish for.

8. Federation Garden

  • The beautifully established and easily maintained grounds and gardens surround the home on 3 sides and add hugely to the amenity of the overall property and provide it with an inherent sense of privacy and space.
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  1. ^ A Brief History of the suburb – City of Vincent
  2. ^ Perth – City of Vincent